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  1. #21
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    The shot on the left is the one that I prefer. Better sharpness.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #22
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    LOL!!!that is very true...and so is the converse! I have to listen to it all the time!
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    The shot on the left is the one that I prefer. Better sharpness.
    More DOF, because stopped down more.
    I don't really see better sharpness in either picture.

  4. #24
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Someday I'd like to have a 6x7 slr, but I've never been able to settle on one particular model. I would like to be able to handle the cameras and judge their ergonomics for myself. I do my family snapshots with a hand-held Koni-Omega, and it would be nice if my slr were also hand-holdable. I suspect that the Pentax 67-II might be easier to handle, but I don't know anyone who owns those cameras to be able to see them and hold them. Anyway, I have no doubt that the RB lenses are excellent. This test just reinforces that impression.
    Charles Hohenstein

  5. #25

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    unless you are doing super-size enlargements, both cameras will give you results that are near-perfect. So much so that it more or less eliminates the quality of the lens as a factor.

    I've heard a few people say that the RB lenses are almost as good as Hasselblad (for a fraction of the price), and if you consider that they are designed to cover 7x7, a 6x6 crop of the centre of a RB67 neg compared with the hassy more or less evens the field.

    Pros for the RB67 are: better focusing, better viewfinder, 1/3 the price
    Cons for the RB67 are: weight, separate advance & cocking levers

  6. #26

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    Chazzy

    Those Koni Omega's are great outfits. It may be the most undervalued camera/system on APUG.

    I've got one I got for all but nothing and carry it in the truck for those boy I wish I had a camera moments.

    Mike

  7. #27
    Joe Grodis's Avatar
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    I'd say "my" biggest advantage with my RB-67 is... it cost me 1/3 that of the "Hassy"
    ------------------------------------
    -Joe
    RB67, ETR, ETRS, F4, F5, FM3a, A1, AE1,
    Bronica-S, Mamiya-7, Yashica TLR, & many many Range finders
    ------------------------------------

  8. #28

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    To really see which lens you prefer you would likely need a much more demanding side by side. When making 20x16 images with lots of fine detail and contrast nuances you get to see which you prefer. The limited tonality of the subject shot in this test and its inability to show the finest detail renders the test incapable of revealing these differences, however subtle they may be. My take would be that both systems are very obviously capable of the best results and if it were me, I would use the RB/RZ in the studio and the smalelr lighter camera in the field. In fact I would ditch the Hassy altogether and use a Mamiya 7II in the field! Many Mamiya lenses are absolutely superb and the bigger neg can make all the difference to tonality as a result of the half-tone effect due to emerging grain. That can matter a lot more than outright resolution. 'Can' being the operative word.

    As an aside, with my 35mm RF I shoot Zeiss and Leica lenses and don't even bother trying to guess which was which when printing. It does not matter as they both do what I need them to do.

  9. #29
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    One was shot at f/8 & 1/250. The other was f/11 at 1/400.
    First of all let me say that I am not a fan of X vs. Y. But on the other hand, I think it's great for people to try out many different bodies and lenses and find their own way. That's what I did and, yes it takes time and patience and an investment, but in the end you have your own sense of which tool is best for you, overall. And you may well decide that you need several different tools for different purposes.

    But back to your test: my feeling is that most MF lenses will give quite similar results at f/8-f/11, in terms of resolution and bokeh. Contrast may differ slightly at such apertures (the Mamiya giving slightly less contrast IMHO, whereas the Fuji lenses tend to be very contrasty and the Zeiss lenses somewhere in between).... but this is seldom an issue with the b&w process, which has so many means for optimizing contrast along the way. It's more a concern with colour.

    You are more likely to see meaningful differences in the 'feeling' imparted by a lens when you shoot it wide open. That is when you see the character(istics) of the glass itself. Generally, all lenses become more and more similar in all respects as you stop down. Okay, there are a few exceptions at the corners and a few other respects, but for the most part, what I am saying is well demonstrated by MTF.

    Again, I think trying things out for yourself is great and should be commended. There is of course always more to it than one can do in any single test.... but it's still worth doing and seeing for yourself.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #30

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    Both are excellant shots, can't make up my mind which I like better.

    Jeff

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