Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,200   Posts: 1,531,526   Online: 1046
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    264

    Hasselblad standard v gliding mirror

    I've been doing a bit of research but just wanted to confirm with some Hassy users please... assuming you don't care about the viewfinder vingetting, is there any other reason to go for a model with a gliding mirror?

    I am not fussed with TTL flash metering either. I realise the 501cm's and 503CW's will generally be much newer etc, but a 500cm and a good CLA is still considerably cheaper. Just making sure I am not missing something obvious ;-) My only thought was whether the gliding mirror might be more accurate for focussing perhaps?

    Out of interest, are there any inherent disadvantages to the gliding mirror?

    Thanks very much.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    No. If you don't care about the vignetting, there is no other advantage the bigger mirror would offer that would make the models with the gliding mirror more desirable.
    Possible that the mirror mechanism in the 555 ELD is more robust (it's the only 'ordinary' Hasselblad having the NASA-specification version of the mirror mechanism).

    And no, there are no disadvantages to the gliding mirror either.

    So if you don't mind the vignetting, and you can find a well kept 500 C/M (both entirely feasible), no need to get a more expensive newer model.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    264
    Thanks for clearing that up QG - I was hoping you might respond ;-) Much appreciated.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    I've been doing a bit of research but just wanted to confirm with some Hassy users please... assuming you don't care about the viewfinder vingetting, is there any other reason to go for a model with a gliding mirror?

    I am not fussed with TTL flash metering either. I realise the 501cm's and 503CW's will generally be much newer etc, but a 500cm and a good CLA is still considerably cheaper. Just making sure I am not missing something obvious ;-) My only thought was whether the gliding mirror might be more accurate for focussing perhaps?

    Out of interest, are there any inherent disadvantages to the gliding mirror?

    Thanks very much.
    And, the only vignetting that I've ever noticed is with the 250CF lens. All others are fine. This is on a 500C/M.

    Regards,
    AlanH
    Regards,
    Alan Huntley
    www.silverscapephoto.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    156
    I have an old 500cm and a 553elx. on the CM with my 150mm/250mm the top of the frame in the viewfinder is obscured, on the elx(the elx has the gliding mirror) this does not happen. Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    rwboyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    MD USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    522
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    And, the only vignetting that I've ever noticed is with the 250CF lens. All others are fine. This is on a 500C/M.

    Regards,
    AlanH
    It is obviously there with every non GLS mirror 500 that I have ever owned or still do at 150mm and worse as you go longer. It is barely detectable at 120mm and really does not limit composition at all in any way. With a 150mm it really does not limit composition much but.... the edge is really really really dark - as in you cannot see the top edge of the frame.

    RB

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    23
    I have a 500CM and lenses up to 250mm - the vignetting is very slight and doesn't bother me in the least. I think people make way too much out of the vignetting - it's not a big deal at all.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    264
    Thanks very much for the info.

    After I first purchased my first 500cm a year ago, I went to a good tech for a CLA and learned heaps about the camera. I may have misunderstood him, but I was told that the standard mirrors rely on foam bumpers to stay in position - and obviously if those bumpers are worn, then focussing would be off. Extrapolating this, I got it into my head that the gliding mirror must be more accurate over time, since the mirror would be held in position more securely and wouldn't need to be maintained as much... Probably a case of thinking 1 +1 = 3 ;-)

    I was having a really good look at my 500cm body about a month ago and it seems the mirror rests on little metal hinges, and on the only foam is located on the top of the body for the mirror up position. I can only assume this foam can't affect focussing but must make a difference to noise?? So anyway, I think I might have had wrong information or I misunderstood what I was being told. The reason I was concerned about it is that my first two bodies seem to focus very poorly (admittedly they were old, beat up and very cheap!) I almost gave up on Hasselblad, but bought a third body (at a proper price) and it has been really wonderful. I guess the reasons for the older bodies being out could be a number of other things like misalignment of the body, focus screen not seated or twisting of the mirror perhaps... so can I assume that foam in the top of the body can't affect focussing?

    Anyway, it's just enjoyable to learn more about the mechanics. I think (rather than say a 501cm) that my next body might be a 503cx if I want to try TTL flash or otherwise another 500cm with a good CLA. All fun!

    Thanks for all your assistance.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    I was having a really good look at my 500cm body about a month ago and it seems the mirror rests on little metal hinges, and on the only foam is located on the top of the body for the mirror up position.
    The foam pads (no. 4 in the image below) are underneath the mirror (no. 5), in the pan the glass lies in (no. 3). You can't see them unless you take the mirror out of that pan.




    If these thingies deteriorate, the mirror will eventually sag and may cause problems with focus.
    But that doesn't happen much. The picture shows how these things work: they push the mirror up against the metal frame (no. 6). And that frame is what sets the correct mirror position.
    So these foam pads only need to do two things. The first is absorb the shock when the mirror comes to a rest after flipping up (the foam you have located does the same). The second is be thick enough to keep the mirror pressed up against the frame.

    The fact that a camera is old does not automatically mean these pads will have gone bad. And even if they go bad, that does not automatically mean that they do not still push the mirror against the frame.


    Focussing error (the type not produced by the person doing the focussing) is mostly due to incorrect body length. Something a competent repair person should be able to check and fix without too much trouble.


    (P.S.
    The picture shows the mirror arrangement in non-GMS cameras. In GMS cameras, the thing is different. The 503 CW, for instance, has a blade spring underneath the mirror, instead of foam pads.)
    Last edited by Q.G.; 12-29-2009 at 03:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    264
    Q.G. - thank you very much. That makes total sense now. So does that means a gliding mirror still has the foam pads or are they unnecessary for that type of mirror? The original tech I used said the mirror foam would only last 7 years at best... but then tech's are often over-cautious ;-) Anyway thanks a lot - I feel as though I have almost 'got it' now!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin