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  1. #111

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    Are they scans of prints made at a 2 or 2-1/2 filter at the normal printing time for the film, and then adjusted in a computer to look just like the actual print? Have you already tested your film to determine its appropriate developing time for normal contrast?

    Since we can't look at the negs in person, if not all these things I named above, what do they really tell us?

    To me, they all look very flat. This is probably due to the flat lighting in your shop, first and foremost. However, it is hard to judge negative exposure and contrast from a positive unless it is printed at a known-standard time and grade.

    As with your past violin pix posted here, I have to say that the biggest problem in my eyes is the lighting, not the film or exposure.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #112
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    No PS and yes they were all scanned at the same settings.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  3. #113

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    Well then the subject matter was "normal" and "flat" enough to render very similar results with reflective or incident readings. This is certainly NOT always the case. Again though, I like the pics.

    BTW, just guessing by the slightly lighter rendition of the wooden table top that the ones of the fiddle were incident readings.
    Last edited by Mike1234; 02-13-2010 at 11:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #114

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    Barry, next time you do any testing, try the same scene with both methods, and try challenging ones with strong highlights and shadows. The light seems to be very even, flat.

  5. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1234 View Post
    Well then the subject matter was "normal" and "flat" enough to render very similar results with reflective or incident readings. This is certainly NOT always the case. Again though, I like the pics.
    I do think the first two look underexposed compared to the last two. Since they were scanned at the same settings, all we can do is judge them against each other, not against a commonly-accepted standard for exposure.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    Barry, next time you do any testing, try the same scene with both methods, and try challenging ones with strong highlights and shadows. The light seems to be very even, flat.
    Yes, and pick subjects that differ in overal brightness... the old charcoal or snow cliche'. Take shots just as the refected meter indicates (middle gray) then adjust exposure to -1, -2, -3, and -4 for the charcoal (or other very dark subject) and +1, +2, +3 and +4 for the snow (or other very bright object). Also take incident readings and just go by what the meter says. Do the same for a scene with a very wide contrast range but meter for the textural shadows and take a -0, -1, -2, -3 and -4 exposures. Then use the incident meter again with this scene.

    Compare unadjusted scans first. Then fiddle withe PS curves to get the best overall detail from each neg. Pay close attention to shadow and highlight detail.

    Please post your results.
    Last edited by Mike1234; 02-13-2010 at 02:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #117
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    I am planning on shooting this violin this evening for the customer. I always shoot violins on a table with a black drape and two hot lights. I will shoot both digital for the customer and film for me.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  8. #118
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    I am planning on shooting this violin this evening for the customer. I always shoot violins on a table with a black drape and two hot lights. I will shoot both digital for the customer and film for me.
    With a black drape, by all means use incident metering.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  9. #119
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    A question to add to the confusion: in a studio setting, like on a tabletop, if I use reflective metering really close to the subject, pointing directly towards the part of the subject I wanna expose according to, can that reading be used and placed in the zone system? (provided I know what area I'm measuring..)

    E.g;

    [refer to the attached pic] I meter the tailpiece really close and the meter gives me a reading of EV 8, I place it in zone III, the upper bout gives me a reading of EV 10, which then will fall in zone V which is consistent what what I have visualized.

    Will this work with an ordinary reflective meter or do I have to have a spot to this metering? Does the metering at close range get influenced by light fall off etc.?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails violinsvg.jpg  

  10. #120
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Excellent question!!! I was thinking the same thing and plan to try that very thing.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA



 

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