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  1. #11
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Didn't we just have a huge thread on this very subject?
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    The difference between the rel=reflective and incident is about 1-1/3 stops...Is it normal for the two types of reading to be different?..........Which will or should be more accurate?
    A reflective and incident read differently, so a 1 1/3 stop difference does not necessarily mean anything is wrong. But a 1 1/3 stop difference between one meter and another like meter is a red flag that something is wrong.

    Both can be very accurate but under different circumstances. The incident meter is accurate for the reflective surfaces in the subject if those surfaces are receiving pretty much the same intensity of light----such as even sunlight on snow or subjects in full shade. But using the incident meter in sun/shade mix situations will overexpose the high values if read in the shade and under expose the shadow values if read in the sunlight.

    An incident meter is also quite useful in the studio when measuring the light intensity of individual lights, in this way, the power of one light can be set to provide a stop or two more or less powerful than any other light.

    A 30 degree angle reflective meter, like my Gossen Luna Pro F (or in-camera center-weighted meter) can be accurate for the reflective surfaces in the subject if there is about equal amounts of light versus dark areas being reflected. But, if there is more dark than light or light than dark, then these readings can lead to poor exposure too.

  3. #13
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rose View Post
    Didn't we just have a huge thread on this very subject?
    Yes, but it broke down into nitpicking and factions over exactly what the proper methods are, so it has good and bad info (just like the rest of the internet), making it a mediocre resource for those who don't have enough experience to judge the validity of any given post.

    Lee

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rose View Post
    Didn't we just have a huge thread on this very subject?
    LOL! I was just thinking that as I hit "Submit Reply", oh well.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rose View Post
    Didn't we just have a huge thread on this very subject?
    Yes, but there are too many opinions and much misinformation.

  6. #16
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    But when you ask a question on this forum it is easy, for me, to tell who know their stuff and who wishes they did. For me one way to tell is go look at their Gallery. Iare the photos good or do they suck? If they are good then the person know how to make good photographs.
    Plus I just know there are certain people here that I trust what they say more than others.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  7. #17

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    STRAD: That's a good general rule of thumb... although darkroom and PS can hide many exposure mistakes. Me... I have nothing in the gallery. I'm just now getting back into serious (fun) photography after twenty-five years of family and financial duties. Even though I haven't shot LF in a quarter century I'll bet I can read and understand a meter (reflective, spot, or incident) better than most. This isn't a defensive posture... just a reply to your generalization. At the risk of alienating some people... many replies (not in this thread necessarily) I see are from folks who couldn't tell a meter from their pete* and probably have difficulties know precisely what to do with either.

  8. #18

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    People may use cameras with built-in reflective light meters exclusively, and produce perfectly exposed photos.
    They still may not even have a clue about incident light metering.


    The difference you noticed, Stradibarius, is due to the brightness of the subject.
    It plays no role in incident light metering. But does in reflected light metering.

    You will have to correct the reflected light reading for the reflective properties of the subject.
    And when you do that, you'll find (or should find anyway) that the two agree, that both lead to the same exposure settings.

    You can only correct for the subject brightness by comparing it to that of a standard surface, a surface whose reflective properties are well known: the grey card already mentioned.

    As you see, incident metering leads to the desired result quicker. It involves less separate steps, thus less opportunity to make mistakes.
    So whenever you can, choose incident light metering.

  9. #19

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    Learn to use a spot meter and how/where to place tonal values as they relate to the brightness of the object metered and compensational development and final print tonal values. Master this and your exposures will be spot on. You'll never need or want a wide-view reflective or incident meter again. Okay... let the flames begin.

  10. #20
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    Thanks for the good info from all of you. IMO you can also judge the answers by the answers given in this and other threads. So Mike I agree the Gallery is not the only way to judge, it is just a way that is the quickest. For many of us that spend a good deal of time on this site you learn the experienced and less experienced participants. You will notice I ask questions but very seldom offer any answers because I don't really feel I have the expertise.
    I didn't mean to besmirch anyone's abilities only to say that you learn to judge the answers and take them for what they are worth.

    At this point I only have a Gossen Luna Pro, ( not a Digi-Pro) so I will have to learn to use it for the time being.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
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