Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,906   Posts: 1,521,418   Online: 1004
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    Steve Mack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Dillwyn, Virginia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    142

    (Relative) Portability of the RB67?

    So, if I wanted to add the Mamiya RB67 to my growing collection, how portable is it? I already own a Mamiya 645Pro, which is fairly easy to lug around. I don't plan to use it for street photography, although I have read of some people using it for just that. But how about lugging to a site? I try to avoid walking more that half a mile. If I have to go more than that I just might decide it really isn't worth it. I'm looking for some portability at my age!

    Thanks to all who reply.

    With best regards,

    Stephen

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    6
    Mamiya RB67 portability? Hahahahahahah! I have been using one for over 2 years as an amateur and I would describe this beast as an iron loaf of bread! The image output is outstanding however. Seriously now, I have used this camera out in the field and as long as you are willing to be transporting it in the trunk of your car along with a tripod, it is transportable. It weighs about 5 1/2 pounds with a 90 mm lens. You will want to use a tripod to get the best resolution out of the camera. If I were looking for a hand-held medium format I would prefer a Mamiya 6 or 7 or other equivalent rangefinder. Having said all this, I swear I saw Annie Liebovitz handling hand holding an RB67 (same form factor and weight) at Obama's inauguration!! She must be mighty strong. So for 'lugging it to a site', I find it worth the effort. Street photography, not a great choice.
    Roman

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Washington, the state
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    16
    Maybe you could get a gym membership.:rolleyes:

  4. #4
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    It's pretty easily portable if you have only one body and one lens or maybe two. You can carry three lenses and several backs and a second body easily if you have a good backpack for it. It also helps a LOT using the WLF instead of the prism. I don't understand the comments that always come up about the size and weight of these cameras making them unluggable. I find them to be much easier to handle than a P67, personally, and much more useful in "the field."

    My standard RZ kit when I go traveling is a combo of my kit and my friend's. It consists of:

    2 RZ bodies
    7 backs
    65mm f/4
    110mm f/2.8
    210mm APO
    WLF
    Prism
    two rubber lens hoods
    bellows lens hood

    It all fits into a medium-sized backpack. The tripod (Bogen 3036 or 3051) goes across my chest or over my shoulder on a strap. You start to feel it after maybe a mile, but I have pretty easily covered 8 miles of hiking this way in about a 6 hour period. (Going slow, taking lots of water/picture breaks is the key.) For more intense hiking (meaning overnight camping, really), I take one body and two lenses only, usually three backs, and no prism.

    For anything but the hiking/camping I mentioned, I feel no need whatsoever to ever pare down the kit for travel.

    For simple, quick, day to day use, I'd probably just have a body, WLF, two backs, and two lenses (65 and 110). This is a very manageable setup with a smallish bag.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-17-2010 at 08:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #5
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,531
    Images
    15
    The above about covers it, add a tripod and you will need a mule or a cart or a Sherpa, or a back surgeon. The one about it being like an iron loaf of bread is the most apt. Put a body and two lenses plus a telexender and the prism and a wlf with some backs and filters in a case, pick it up and carry it around a city block a couple of times. If it isn't a problem then you have it licked.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,735
    It is relative portable if you have the right back pack.

    Jeff

  7. #7
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    It is relative portable if you have the right back pack.

    Jeff
    And the right back. :rolleyes:

  8. #8
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,255
    Images
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    Maybe you could get a gym membership.:rolleyes:
    No, no, you can cancel your gym membership. Kill two birds with one iron loaf of bread, so to speak.
    Seriously, I'm almost 69, I have two lenses (65 and 127) and two backs and I find it very manageable with a small backpack. Usually my FM3A is in the same pack, with an extra couple of lenses. The most awkward piece is the tripod, which I carry separately.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,054
    Images
    60
    My Mamiya RB67 with WLF, one back, one grip and two lenses in a camera case is a bit smaller and about the same weight as my Mamiya 645 Pro with prism finder, two backs, one grip and three lenses in a camera case.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,531
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    No, no, you can cancel your gym membership. Kill two birds with one iron loaf of bread, so to speak.
    Seriously, I'm almost 69, I have two lenses (65 and 127) and two backs and I find it very manageable with a small backpack. Usually my FM3A is in the same pack, with an extra couple of lenses. The most awkward piece is the tripod, which I carry separately.

    OK, so I stretched it a bit due to its reputation. I put mine in a back pack with the body, wlf, prism, three backs, and two lenses with accessories and walked around Arches National Park for a "while" with my wife. It wasn't that difficult at all and when we got back to the truck my wife said the bag did overburden here much on the way back.

    So it can be done easily and I'm just ten years younger than johnnywalker and have lift that bale tote that barge pills to make it happen. Only problem now is I've had to go off of the lift that bale tote that barge pills, some, not all. If I lightened the load and planned the excursion I could do just fine and there is nothing wrong with a stroller to haul it around. They even have Nation Park approved ones. I haven't tried sitting in one yet but I'll give it a try when my wife is not working all the time. I could even load backs sitting in there, or just take a nap until we're at the location. Just kidding of course, life isn't that simple is it? I said to the Doctor the other day that I felt a little stressed these days and he said, join the rest of us.

    I really like this camera a lot and have never regretted getting it. BTW I think Mamiya is an excellent camera manufacturer.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin