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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrosenlof View Post
    I had a 'III'. The film advance does indeed close the shutter. I never saw an issue with that. That "feature" is naturally more convenient for longer exposures, but it's workable even for a couple of seconds.
    I have a GSW690 and a GW690III. The film advance lever closes the shutter on both cameras, and does so with just a slight movement. I doubt that touching the lever to advance the film would cause any problem, even with short exposure times. Must admit that for a long time I thought the only way to close the shutter was by turning the shutter speed setting, which I find a lot less convenient that turning the film advance lever.

    Sandy King

  2. #22
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Using the film advance might cause problems if there are any bright highlights in the scene such as streetlights. The film may move slightly before the shutter fully closes. But I just use the lens cap...compared to using barrel lenses on LF cameras, it is only half the work. Being able to start the exposure with a cable release is very nice as there is less chance of vibration.

    I actually sent our Fuji 6x7 back thinking the shutter was faulty -- got a photocopied portion of the manual back...:rolleyes: But now I just tell our students about it's little quirk -- it is in high demand.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #23

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    A direct quote from the manual for my GW690III:

    " On time exposure, it is also possible to trip the shutter by operating the film advance lever, but the film will advance and move your picture out of position in this case. To trip the shutter on time exposure, always turn the shutter speed selector. Do not operate the film advance lever."

    What this means is that the shutter remains open for a bit while the film is advancing. As Vaughn said above, highlights end up being stretched out into the next frame. You get a partial double exposure.

    You need to cover the lens if you are using the film advance lever to close the shutter. I ruined a roll of film the first time I tried using the film advance instead of the shutter speed ring. Just one of those lessons learned.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #24
    rmolson's Avatar
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    I have a Fuji GW670II and while the time feature doesn’t bother me the collapsible lens hood is a pain. While carrying it the other day it slipped of my shoulder and hit the asphalt. My fault for using a cloth camera strap wearing a nylon weather breaker. But the camera is built like the proverbial hockey puck. Except the hood took the brunt of the fall and was dinked. Dinked in the collapsed position so that was the end of shooting that day. I hate that hood with a passion anyway .So I took my trusty Dremel and cut it off and now have a nice rubber hood and can see the settings unencumbered. And the upside is now it is not salable and I will not make the mistake of selling it off and then later regretting having done so

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    A direct quote from the manual for my GW690III:

    " On time exposure, it is also possible to trip the shutter by operating the film advance lever, but the film will advance and move your picture out of position in this case. To trip the shutter on time exposure, always turn the shutter speed selector. Do not operate the film advance lever."

    What this means is that the shutter remains open for a bit while the film is advancing. As Vaughn said above, highlights end up being stretched out into the next frame. You get a partial double exposure.

    You need to cover the lens if you are using the film advance lever to close the shutter. I ruined a roll of film the first time I tried using the film advance instead of the shutter speed ring. Just one of those lessons learned.

    Peter Gomena
    Good information. I did not see that in my manual, or perhaps I did and forgot about it. But whether closing the shutter with the speed ring or with the film advance lever I have always covered the lens first. It is just intuitive because it is obvious that either way you will be touching the camera before the shutter closes.

    Sandy King

  6. #26
    Helcio Tagliolatto's Avatar
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    That feature is not stupid at all! It's the most creative way any maker has done in order to suppress the real possibility that a mechanical, spring loaded shutter has to catch between two ranges of speed, if you try to change the shutter speed after it has been armed.
    It doesn't ever catch, but sometimes it does.

  7. #27

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    I have a "II" and initially tried to end my long exposures using the film advance lever, with disastrous result. YMMV but the couple negs I had that I used this with were definitely ruined by the drag. Normal range of tones as well, not like the streetlights at night example posted above. The shutter speed change method works well though, it really is a nice camera.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by 5stringdeath View Post
    Working in IT all day, this sentence makes me laugh with rage
    Manuals are only included to provide padding during shipping. They were never meant to be read.

  9. #29
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Anyone else have a issue with this?
    Some of my cameras and remote controls have a Bulb (B) exposure feature; some have a Timed (T) exposure feature. I use them both and I like them both. I use a piece of thick black felt material to cover my lens while I am manually closing the shutter at the end of a timed (T) exposure. I also use the felt to cover my lens while performing a long T or B exposure at night when a vehicle just happens to drive by with its headlights on.

    So, in answer to your question, no, I do not have an issue with it. I do, however, have an issue if the camera is incorrectly calling a T exposure a B exposure. Exactly how is it labeled on your camera?

  10. #30
    erikg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by narsuitus View Post
    ... Exactly how is it labeled on your camera?
    The fujis are marked "T". It is a bit annoying, but in their defense the camera really ideal for hand held exposures. Not a great defense I know, but there are workarounds.

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