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  1. #41
    jreitsma's Avatar
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    Back in the early 70's I used to shoot AGFACHROME (beautiful film, by the way) and it came in metal canisters (even then, this was an novelty).

    Later-Joe

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by wruzin View Post
    Look in the candy aisle at your favorite store and find the little plastic tubes that M&Ms are sold in. The come in two sizes; the smaller one is perfect for one roll of 120/220 and the larger tube will accommodate two rolls. The plastic is translucent, so it won't seal out light completely, but these little tubes are great for offering physical protection for the film. The M&Ms are a bonus and great as well.
    I'm amazed it took till page 5 for this to come out. I use them for the physical protection while in the bag.

  3. #43

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    The Rollei Superpan 200 comes in sturdy plastic containers that can also be bought separately ( like this)... I once bought ten of those films (lovely stuff, by the way, and not too expensive) and use the canisters regularly. With 35mm film I actually hate to have all the empty cans lying around once the film is developed and archived. It's nice to have something for safe transport, but once you got over 50 of these things strewn all over the lab, it becomes an annoyance. I'd rather pay a few cents less per film and leave out the extra packaging.

    I also have wooden boxes with compartments that I take with me for travels. One contains 8 135s and a slightly bigger one 5 120s. Looks better and works just as well as the throw-away plastic containers that end up in some landfill sooner or later.

    As for the question "Why doesn't medium format film come in canisters like 35mm?" - because it's not necessary at all. If you need extra containers, there are more than enough other possibilities.

  4. #44

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    I open the plastic envelop containing the rollfilm only at one end and keep it to put the exposed film back into it

    Paul

  5. #45

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    I am going to get some M&M on the way home from work tonight, I'm not really worried about light, or unwinding, but dust and lint in my pocket. Actually Dust and lint period combined with me being a twit at times and tossing the film in my pocket with keys, coins and whatever else, I haven't had a problem yet, but I know it's coming.

  6. #46
    Stoo Batchelor's Avatar
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    I just drop all my exposed film in one of these attached to my camera bag so as not to have to worry about it.

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Lowepro-FILM-D...item27b207376d

    Stoo
    _____________________________________________

  7. #47

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    Well, I picked up 6 M&M minis small packs and I have just one left to eat! They were a bargain at two for $.88, and they came with some free candy ;-) I did learn that you do not want to put film in them while it is still wrapped in the foil as they are just a little too small for that. I wonder what my local 120 shop is going to say when I show up with my film in these containers.

  8. #48

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    Sep 2006
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    I don't know if it is necessarily about protection at least exclusively. I know with efke films it helps to use a cannister to protect it from light.
    just my 2 cents

  9. #49
    greybeard's Avatar
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    I'm old enough to remember when 35mm Kodachrome came in a screw-top aluminum can, with the cloth bag that you used for mailing the film back for processing. However, I'm not old enough to know when black-and-white 35mm film first came on the market or how it was packaged back then. I have a few 2-1/4 color transparencies that are slightly pre-WWII, so I presume that they were Kodachrome; would this have been in a canister for mailing?

    Anyone?

  10. #50

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    All the 35mm slide film I shot in the Navy in the early 60's came that way. I can't remember when the plastic flip-top type came along. I used the cloth mail-in bags for a long time, then I think they changed to some sort of paper bag. And I shot Kodak 35mm B&W in the Philippines in 1961 and 1962, so B&W was at least that early.

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