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  1. #11
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Neat trick for the multiple exposure - it would have taken me a long time to think of that one.

    Any idea where to find a cable release for a Hasselblad? KEH doesn't seem to have any, or at least if they do, it's not obvious.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    Neat trick for the multiple exposure - it would have taken me a long time to think of that one.

    Any idea where to find a cable release for a Hasselblad? KEH doesn't seem to have any, or at least if they do, it's not obvious.
    It takes a standard cable release.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    It takes a standard cable release.

    Steve
    While this is certainly true, the Hasselblad can be finicky when it comes to cable releases.
    I have at least one standard cable releasse that will work on every mechanical camera I own but the screw in part is tapered and will not mount on my 500 c/m. Also, some releases will not protrude far enough into the release socket to trip the hasselblad shuttter. The end is too short.

    A release can also get in the way if you are using the older style quick focus handle for a "C" lens. You will also need a u adapter for the release if you end up using a compendium style Pro Shade.

    If you can, try the release first to make sure it fires and you can worry about dealing with the Pro Shade if you decide to get one later.
    Last edited by brucemuir; 06-19-2010 at 11:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

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    Also suggest a second back - for switching between colour and b&w films.

    Probably worth getting a light seal kit off eBay. I replaced all the seals in my backs when I bought them.

  5. #15

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    Have you used a camera that has a waist level viewfinder before? If so and you like it, the Hasselblad is a great camera (but like any camera it has its compromises). If you haven't, I would recommend picking up a Yashica Mat 124 (or the 124G) for about a hundred bucks and see if you like that style of shooting.

  6. #16
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    With regard to lens choice, it may be a consideration that the C and C T* lenses have a self-timer built into the lens, whereas in the newer versions (CF and on) this feature has been omitted. (There is no self-timer on the body of the camera.)

  7. #17
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    I use a twin lens reflex with a waistlevel finder, so I do have some experience. Overall, it's a bit nicer than a prism finder.

    The listing I'm currently looking at has a 80mm C T* lens, though I can get the same thing with a CF T* lens for about an extra $70. I don't know the differences (other than the CF T* is newer and apparently the C T* has a timer). Is the difference worth the extra money?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    I use a twin lens reflex with a waistlevel finder, so I do have some experience. Overall, it's a bit nicer than a prism finder.

    The listing I'm currently looking at has a 80mm C T* lens, though I can get the same thing with a CF T* lens for about an extra $70. I don't know the differences (other than the CF T* is newer and apparently the C T* has a timer). Is the difference worth the extra money?
    $70 is well worth it.

    • The C lenses are getting harder to repair due to lack of parts.
    • Furthermore, the CF lenses handle more easily. It has to do with locking and unlocking the aperture and shutter speed rings together.
    • C lenses use B50 filters; CF lenses use B60 filters; B60 filters are easier to find.
    • Both have the same optical prescription but the T* coating of the CF reduces flares and that alone is worth it. [Yes, there are a few C lenses with it, but pick at your own postings, you know who you are. Not yeknom02]


    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    • Both have the same optical prescription but the T* coating of the CF reduces flares and that alone is worth it. [Yes, there are a few C lenses with it, but pick at your own postings, you know who you are. Not yeknom02]
    Is it me? (I should perhaps ask "am i me?", but somehow that doesn't sound right. Though i'm sure it is)

    There were more C 80 mm lenses produced with T* than without. Not a lot more, but more.
    If you want to be sure an 80 mm C lens has the T* coating, get a black one.

    As mentioned, CF ergonomics are better than that of the C lenses. Rubberized focussing ring, instead of the knurled metal thing. Better flash terminal, Better DoF preview. And easier to set shutterspeed and aperture rings.

    CF lenses do take bayonet 60 filters, the C lenses take bayonet 50 filters. But contrary to what was suggested, bayonet 50 filters are not harder to find than bayonet 60 filters.

  10. #20

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    Pop the extra $70, Newer lens, better handling, look cooler ;]
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

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