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  1. #1
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Buying a Hasselblad Outfit

    Selling some digital gear, I'm able to put some money toward a Hasselblad 500C/M outfit on KEH.com in a few weeks. Apparently, here's what's included:

    -body with waistlevel viewfinder
    -80 mm lens
    -A12 film back with 12 release

    Should I plan on getting some more equipment to fill in any missing pieces? I don't really know the layout of a Hasselblad all that well, and I've been hearing about darkslides, darkslide holders, and all sorts of stuff. Can I assume this is standard?

    Has anyone else picked up a Hasselblad outfit before? What else should I make sure my order includes in order to have a "complete" rig?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  2. #2

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    Make sure it's got a focusing screen in the body and a darkslide for the back.
    There were two 12 exposure backs, the 12 & 12A. The 12 loads like an old folding camera & has a viewing port in the back to see when you're at the first frame, then you set the counter.
    The 12A you just line up the arrow on the backing paper and the start mark in the holder, close it up & crank the film to the first frame. Marginally easier.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #3

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    That's about 90%, you may want to add a strap, the body probably won't come with one, and a lens hood would be nice. For the WLF, I'd recommend the "newer" style, which is hinged on the sides.

    Generally the backs are supplied with the darkslide, and if it's not included, they should so state. I've not seen any offered by KEH that weren't also described as defective that didn't include the slide. You need one because the back cannot be removed from the camera without it, though with one back, you won't have much reason to take it off.
    Newer A12 backs have a darkslide holder glued to the end, and they used to be offered as aftermarket accessories (and still are on ebay). It would be handy, but it's never seemed that important to me. Lot's of people recommend that you leave the slide out unless you're changing the back to make the seal last longer. I put the slide in the bag where the camera lives, or in a pocket if I'm changing backs around.

    Have a look at Hasselblad Historical; http://www.hasselbladhistorical.eu/ there is a lot of information there, including PDF manuals.

  4. #4

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    Optech straps for your Hasselblad are nice, I use one and it is one of the better $26 I have spent. Even cheaper here: http://www.amazon.com/Op-Tech-Super-.../dp/B0008167BM

    Most people will tell you to get a CF style lens with your kit because parts not being made for the older C style lenses anymore. This was an important consideration for me but I also preferred the ergonomics of the newer style lenses.

  5. #5

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    A "12 release" back is a back that has the number "12" printed on the magazine release button. That was a 'late' thing (before, the winged V logo was on that button) which was only seen on A(utomatic) 12 backs, the 12A John mentioned.

    What will make a big difference to the price you should pay (a little less for how the thingy works) is what version 80 mm lens is with the camera.
    The earliest version (called "C") obviously is older (and thus more likely to need service soon and more often), and handles a little different from the 'middle' version (CF), or the latest (CFi/CFE) versions.
    The C version also came in a "chrome" finish first, a black version later. The earlier ones also had a single layer anti reflection coating.
    A C lens would be fine, provided it has been serviced lately. Else, a CF would be the better one to get. The latest CFi/CFE would be too expensive (because youngest) without offering much extra over the CF.

  6. #6

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    One thing you will be needing is some sort of light meter. If you have been shooting digital, you probably have been using the one built into the camera. The 500CM does not have a light meter built into it. You options are for a handheld light meter or a prism with a light meter built in. Each has it's advantages.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hspluta View Post
    One thing you will be needing is some sort of light meter. If you have been shooting digital, you probably have been using the one built into the camera. The 500CM does not have a light meter built into it. You options are for a handheld light meter or a prism with a light meter built in. Each has it's advantages.
    I have a meter in the prism, PME. It does a weighted average over the center area and works very well. I have not had any bad exposures with it nor any operational problems.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I have a meter in the prism, PME. It does a weighted average over the center area and works very well. I have not had any bad exposures with it nor any operational problems.

    Steve
    I have not used a PME series prism, I hear the meter is quite nice on them. I do have the new model Kiev Spot/TTL prism and it actually is very consistent once you calibrate it. But of course it is quite heavy and I prefer using a hand held spot whenever practical.

    Best, Harry

  9. #9
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the help - one question I forgot to ask though... do I need any special equipment for multiple exposures or long exposures? Those are the two techniques I love to experiment with.

    By the way, I have a Gossen Luna-Pro F, so I'm good with a light meter. I think I'm going to try to convert everything to incident metering anyway, since I hear it gives more consistent results.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Multiple exposures are made by putting the dark slide after the photograph is taken, the back is removed, the crank is turned which lowers the mirror and cocks the shutter. Then the back is replaced and then the dark slide is removed.

    Long exposures should be done on a tripod and with a cable release.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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