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Thread: Printing 6X6

  1. #11
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cesaraugusta View Post
    I strive not to adhere to standards when originality is the primary objective.
    I totally agree but if I give square prints as an output, I don't want people to run into a problem when wanting to frame or something and then coming back to me angry.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #12

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    When i had a square image I would use a square frame, but can't find neislson frames very easy any more.Do crop a lot to rectangular,depends on photo.
    Mike

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    So is the result a square paper or rectangular one?
    I cut to square and use the bits as the test strips, works s well, there's no wastage.

    Then I matt & frame in rectangular frames for my own exhibition sets, however I've started to frame square for one off print sales.

    Ian

  4. #14
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    I print full frame on 8x10 paper and trim edges to about a 1/2". I am set up to do all my own matting, mounting and framing, having worked in a high-end frame shop while in school really helps on that end.

    and I do love a square format in a rectangular frame, bottom-weighted.
    Last edited by VaryaV; 06-29-2010 at 12:55 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: more

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Square pictures in rectangular frames look great. If they are top weighted.

    Just tell people up-front what to expect format wise.

    I usually crop however I see fit based on what the picture calls for. But, I have a fondness for the 3:4 ratio in portraits, which works out to 6x8" or 9x12" with exactly 1" border on 8x10" and 11x14" paper.
    The attached print is 6x8" on 8x10" paper, cropped from a 120 6x6 neg in the Hasselblad.
    I mount rectangular and square prints top weighted in rectangular frames. I rarely use square frames.

    - Thomas


    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    I totally agree but if I give square prints as an output, I don't want people to run into a problem when wanting to frame or something and then coming back to me angry.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails erin-portrait_001.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Any of the above. I have also printed full-frame with black pillar- or letter-boxes so that the image would fit in a standard matte. It might be unorthodox but if Mom can't put it in a standard size matte/frame it will never get framed.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I usually print 6x6 so the larger borders are on the sides of the paper. When framing I frequently use a vertical rectangular frame and make the mat with top and sides the same and have the excess mat at the bottom.

  8. #18
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    In general, I print what I like out of the negative, but assuming my neurons were firing when I composed in the viewfinder, I usually print 6x6 as square. The beauty of this is that I can precut the paper to approximately square and use the offcut for test strips. I have varied over time, but generally frame the square print optically centered in a rectangular frame, long dimension vertical.

    But there's no law about it!


  9. #19
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I do as DWThomas. I make the tops and sides have the same border, and the bottom comes out to what ever size is leftover on the standard sized frame. This creates a very balanced look for square images (in my opinion).

    Also, since I float mount the prints (dry mounted print is smaller than the mat opening) I leave extra space on the bottom for the signature, again with the top and sides being equal.

  10. #20
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I dont like cropping in the darkroom, I compose full frame for whichever format I'm shooting, and print accordingly. If you are shooting portraits, show the client samples of how YOU like to display, and sell them on your work. I've not had a customer mad because a photo wasn't what they expected. Your customer should know what they are going to get up front. After all, they are paying you for your vision.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

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