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  1. #11

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    The trigger voltage on those Metz CT-1s is very high, so I haven't paired them up with a DSLR to practise. Of course, I could use my new wireless triggers to connect the Metz and the DSLRs without worrying about the voltage.

    I wonder how Cactus triggers like 500v?
    My other camera is a Pentax

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmamigo View Post
    The trigger voltage on those Metz CT-1s is very high, so I haven't paired them up with a DSLR to practise. Of course, I could use my new wireless triggers to connect the Metz and the DSLRs without worrying about the voltage.

    I wonder how Cactus triggers like 500v?
    Many of the less expensive imported triggers include a recommendation that they be used with a trigger voltage of 12v or lower.

    It is usually hidden in the specifications, and in awkward English.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I have just opened up my Cactus receiver to take a look at the component used to fire the flash. It's a MCR 100-6 silicon controlled rectifier (or thyristor) and is rated at 400 volts and 0.8A according to the datasheet: http://www.hsin.com.sg/products/data...MCR100-6,8.pdf

    Note: The data sheet states this is a minimum and is tested up to 1010 volts.

    I suspect that most modern cameras use a similar device and it is my personal opinion that all the scare stories we hear about not putting old flashes on modern cameras is mythology invented to help sales of new equipment.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Steve:

    It may be that the most recent cameras are being engineered to avoid the problem.

    I had a conversation a few (3 or 4?) years ago with a camera repair technician who indicated that they were seeing a lot of work because of the incompatibility between trigger voltages on older flashes and the circuitry in digital and newer film cameras.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quite a common suggestion with Canon cameras is that the X sync socket is o.k with high voltages but the hot shoe is not. In reality this is nonesense as they are probably wired in parallel or at least have identical circuitry.

    I think the main worry with high voltage flashes on newer cameras is the possibility of sliding a fully charged flash into the hot shoe and having the centre contact momentarily touch one of the other control/TTL pins and causing some damage there rather than the actual trigger circuit.

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    It may be that the most recent cameras are being engineered to avoid the problem.
    Quite possibly. It should have been the case that they were engineered like that from the start so that there never was a problem as it is very easy to do.

    I had a brief dabble in that other imaging technology in 2003 with a Nikon D100 and that was certainly o.k. up to 250 volts. If a camera uses an SCR circuit to trigger the flash (which is the most logical method) it would be very difficult to find one rated at less than 250 volts - more likely 400 volts as a minimum.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #16
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

    It should have been the case that they were engineered like that from the start so that there never was a problem ...
    Damn straight!

  7. #17
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    Just thought I'd mention that I shoot almost 100% of my sessions / jobs with a Bronica ETRS, 75mm 2.8 lens, 120 back, and a handheld light meter. And that's it. No fill flash, almost never change lenses, no winders, no gizmos, no reflectors or other modifiers, nada. Oh, and a roll of Scotch tape. lol.

    You only need what you need. Some people need more gear to suit their chosen methods than others; as long as it works for you, you're fine.

    - CJ

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Last time I took my ETRS out, I took off all of the 'superfluous' bits like the hand grip winder and the prism and just took out the body, 50mm lens and waist level finder. In this form it was a much nicer and easier piece of equipment to take out on a long walk - which is where/how I do most of my photography.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19
    wiltw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I have just opened up my Cactus receiver to take a look at the component used to fire the flash. It's a MCR 100-6 silicon controlled rectifier (or thyristor) and is rated at 400 volts and 0.8A according to the datasheet: http://www.hsin.com.sg/products/data...MCR100-6,8.pdf

    Note: The data sheet states this is a minimum and is tested up to 1010 volts.

    I suspect that most modern cameras use a similar device and it is my personal opinion that all the scare stories we hear about not putting old flashes on modern cameras is mythology invented to help sales of new equipment.


    Steve.
    Early Canon EOS cameras were indeed very, very vulnerable to trigger voltages above 6v. It was NOT until Canon came out with the 350D and 20D that they raised the trigger voltages to 250v. Not a myth, a very real issue for Canon cameras for about 20 years!!! Same issue for other brands of SLRs, which also switched from mechanical contacts for flash synch to electronic circuits for flash triggering.

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    It was NOT until Canon came out with the 350D and 20D that they raised the trigger voltages to 250v. Not a myth, a very real issue for Canon cameras for about 20 years!!!
    Possibly - but still something which should never have happened. If I was a camera designer there would be no way that I would consider designing a camera which was not compatible with existing flash equipment.

    I will accept then that there were some cameras made with such incompetent design that a standard flash currently available could damage them but it really is inexcusable as it only take a £0.03/$0.02 component to trigger a flash with up to 400v trigger voltage.

    I still think it was a design issue forced by marketing to increase sales.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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