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  1. #1
    la.triglia's Avatar
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    Hasselblad 503cx-shutters in two phases

    Dear Hassy-lovers,

    Today pushing for a shot my 503cx, instead to get a simultaneous shutters action, the shot was operating in two phases and I had to press again the shutter to complete. What is going to happen? What I have to do? Thanks in advance.
    Ciao, Aldo
    <°Aldo><

  2. #2

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    Can you describe in detail what happened, in what order?

    But a blind guess, or rather hint: there are two shutters in a Hasselblad.
    The one in the lens is timed, and only requires you pressing the release button.
    The auxillary shutter in the rear (the thing that shields the film from light when the shutter in the lens is open so you can focus and compose) is timed by your finger pressing the release button.
    When you press the button, both shutters open. The shutter in the lens will close after the timer in the lens has finished what it does. The one in the rear slams shut the moment you take the finger off the release button.
    Those two events, both shutters closing independently from each other, may be what you noticed.

  3. #3
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by la.triglia View Post
    Dear Hassy-lovers,

    Today pushing for a shot my 503cx, instead to get a simultaneous shutters action, the shot was operating in two phases and I had to press again the shutter to complete. What is going to happen? What I have to do? Thanks in advance.
    Ciao, Aldo
    Does this happen at ALL shutter speeds?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #4

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    Only on the ones where you forget to hold the shutter button down. I forget exactly where it becomes a concern. Maybe 1/8 second and slower?

    Peter gomena

  5. #5

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    Some speeds require the shutter to be held down. But that is dependent on the lens. How slow was the shot?

  6. #6
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raoul View Post
    Some speeds require the shutter to be held down. But that is dependent on the lens. How slow was the shot?
    ??? Which lens does not require the shutter release to be held down?

    I thought that the "back curtains" were activated by the body mechanism, independent of the lens shutter.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #7

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    The number in the book is 1/15, it kind of depends on how fast your finger is, though 1/15 sec may be how fast the mechanism can cycle. Which lens is mounted doesn't matter.

  8. #8
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    Hi!

    For most of my cameras, when triggering the shutter with my finner, I have always held the shutter button "in" "down" depending where it's located until the cycle is complete. Even the Rolleiflex cameras I do the same. Does it prevent jerky motion? I think it does, at least to me it does. Perhaps I'm wrong but my thinking is that one movement, pressing to trigger the shutter, helps prevent slight movement as compared to press to trigger and immediately release where if you have a fast finger then there could possibly be movement when releasing it.

    Maybe I'm full of hot air but it's what I have done for many years. At least a million of them!

    Your thoughts?
    Bill Clark

  9. #9

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    My thoughts?

    You're not full of hot air.

    But the question is how fast your finger are, i.e. whether it is possible at all to remove your finger from the release button before the shutter has finished doing its job at 1/1000.
    1/500?
    1/30?

  10. #10

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    Aldo,

    Can you describe what happens?
    We're just guessing here, and what we are saying is perhaps way off the mark.

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