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  1. #21
    Two23's Avatar
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    I have this exact camera and use it almost daily for a shot or two. Here's what I know. They were made from about 1949 to 1961. Yours looks to be from the early 50s, judging from the metal film wind knob and the body release is on the right-hand side of the strap. The very first year or two there was no provision for flash attachment (right-hand side.) Mine was made about 1959. Camera takes 120 film, with a catch. I use regular 120 film and put a 620 take-up spool in position. There are a couple of metal tabs you can bend so they don't contact the inside of the camera. Do a google search. I put a little silicone spray lube on the film spools so they turn much easier. You might have to take the viewfinder apart to clean out dust. Easy to figure out. The shutter is about 1/50s, and aperture is about f16 to f22. I've been shooting ISO 400 film in mine, adjusting exposure by using either ND or colored filters. I put a piece of black velcro over the red window because sunlight will leak in there if it's uncovered. I have my (local) lab save the 620 spools for me so I can reuse them. I tried cutting down a 120 spool to use as a take up spool, but that just didn't work for me. In older versions like yours, I think the 120 spools will work as take-up also, especially if you bend the tabs. Camera is plastic, not Bakelite. I've been getting some cool artistic shots from it. Camera's official name is Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash. It is possible to change the flash sync from bulb to electronic by adjusting when the internal switch makes contact. I haven't done that though. I try not to place camera in bright sun because I think it might have a small light leak somewhere. If you take the lens out to clean it, look for a little metal stub and remember which way it went. If the lens is glass, it is an older model. If plastic it's a newer one.


    Kent in SD

  2. #22
    fotch's Avatar
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    Sure brings back memories. This was the family camera and I started using it. I recall having a close up attachment lens that slipped over the lens. I think you could get in focused photos at 3 about 3 foot. Somewhere, I still have most of the photos from this camera. This would of been mid fifties. I don't have the camera anymore. Probably look at it as junk as I got older and grew into a better camera.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #23
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Can't let this pass without providing the following link:


    This page contains detailed instructions on how to disassemble a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye and clean the simple meniscus lens and the viewfinder optics. I did this to my Hawkeye and the optics now look like new.

    Interestingly, using black photographic tape I also managed to mask off a portion of the opening in the simple rotary shutter to decrease my effective shutter speed. This sharpened up my negatives significantly from reduced hand shake.

    In fact, I also measured and calculated the actual fixed lens aperture, added a filter factor for a #8 yellow filter, then used one of those Calumet shutter testers to help me mask off just the right amount of the shutter opening to give me perfect exposures (HP5+) when using that filter. Now I not only get nice clouds, but even more sharpness in my b&w negatives from the monochromatic subject light.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #24
    fotch's Avatar
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    Ken, what shutter speed are you getting now?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    Ken, what shutter speed are you getting now?
    About 1/250th of a second. Unmodified it originally measured 1/40th of a second. The unavoidable clunk associated with tripping the shutter was leaving me with too many blurred negatives.

    This post made by me on 5/21/2008 describes in more detail the modifications I made.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #26
    fotch's Avatar
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    Wow, 1/250th, that is impressive. Who would of thought. I remember always looking for something to set it on then hold it down firmly, before snapping. Really great idea you had.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #27
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    About 1/250th of a second. Unmodified it originally measured 1/40th of a second. The unavoidable clunk associated with tripping the shutter was leaving me with too many blurred negatives.

    This post made by me on 5/21/2008 describes in more detail the modifications I made.

    Ken
    Wow, that is pretty snappy, wouldn't you say?

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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