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  1. #1
    Holly's Avatar
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    Can you use mirror lock-up on RZ II when doing time exposures?

    ...Or will the shutter just close after 55 seconds?
    I can't seem to decipher from my RZ manual how to use a cable release, mirror lock-up, and a 10 minute exposure all at the same time.
    Help!
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I don't know the answer but mirror lock up will be of little or no benefit with a ten minute exposure.


    Steve.

  3. #3

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    I've done exposures from 4 to 15 minutes with my RB67. Mirror lock-up wasn't necessary.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  4. #4
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Think of it like this: you go through all this effort, you use a cable release and get your mirror to be up before the shutter opens ... and then, when you think the exposure is done and while the shutter is still open you have to grab the damned lens and have to manually shift the switch from T to N position to close the shutter. Believe me, of all the things the RZ67 is near perfect for, and there are many of them, long term exposure is not one of them. If shake free long term exposures are a must (e.g. you have a bright point light source in the frame), either pick another camera or use a gobo to cover the lens as a substitute for the shutter.

  5. #5
    tac
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    I constructed an 8 inch by 8 inch piece of cardboard covered with black velveteen to use as a "shutter" while working the mechanism on my RZ for long exposures, as previously noted.

  6. #6
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I place the lens cap on front if not using a hood (In overcast weather or other low light I sometimes don't bother.), or my hand, a notebook, a 4x5 film box, etc. over the lens if I am using a hood. In a ten minute exposure, the time it takes to do that is a small fraction of the exposure, so while it is technically exposed onto the film, it does not show up in the picture.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #7
    Holly's Avatar
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    Aha! Fake shutter, genius. Why didn't I think a that.
    Reason I want mirror lockup is because the shot I want would be at night, with passing figures and
    traffic but also with fixed structures like roads/buildings which need to be as sharp as humanly possible,
    with as big a depth of field as poss. So I want to try to get the smallest ap I can. Figured that my
    issues in the past of doing the f32+ apertures during the day, and not using MLU, and getting the perfect
    shot *apart from the bloody camera tremor* meant it was necessary to use MLU at any time of day or
    night.
    But then, whoever pointed that out about manually moving the dial from T to N, you're right, it's going to
    give a little shake at that point anyway! Hmmmmm. There doesn't seem to be a way to keep everything
    super-sharp other than putting a
    black screen of some sort in front of the lens at the end of the time exp. and THEN moving the T/N dial.

  8. #8
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    If you're worried about mirror vibration at the beginning of the exposure, hold something over the lens before you trip the shutter and remove it a few seconds after tripping it, then start timing.

    BTW, the cover the lens technique predates mechanical shutters. A hat was commonly used to time the exposure back in ye olden days when all exposures were long.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #9
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    Reason I want mirror lockup is because the shot I want would be at night, with passing figures and traffic but also with fixed structures like roads/buildings which need to be as sharp as humanly possible, with as big a depth of field as poss. So I want to try to get the smallest ap I can. Figured that my issues in the past of doing the f32+ apertures during the day, and not using MLU, and getting the perfect shot *apart from the bloody camera tremor* meant it was necessary to use MLU at any time of day or night.
    Two more things to consider: first, if you use tiny apertures, diffraction is going to kill your sharpness. See here for details, replace grain size for pixel size to make it applicable to film photography. To make a long story short: you can't have infinite DOF and sharpness at the same time.

    Second: I wouldn't worry about 3 seconds of camera shake in a 10 minute exposure. Just do the math how those 3 seconds register in the frame, they're only 1/200 of the total exposure, which is 7-8 stops below! The only time camera shake matters is, as I wrote above, if you have bright static point light sources in the picture.

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Camera shake is at it's most noticeable when the shutter speed is the same duration as the shake lasts for. As you increase the time the shutter is open for, the fraction of the camera shake time compared to the total exposure time gets smaller and therefore less noticeable.

    For a ten minute exposure, even using the silly shutter closing method Mamiya (and Bronica) use on their lenses will not show any reduction in sharpness on the final image. The black cloth/black board/lens cap/hat covering method is a good one though especially for exposures of a few seconds.


    Steve.

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