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  1. #11
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    At my current level of competence in printing, I need all the test strips I can get! So I trim my paper first and save the offcuts. 11 x 14 Ilford Warmtone is expensive experimenting, so usually I cut the offcut into two or three pieces and test on what my eyes tell me are critical spots before risking a full sheet.

    Like wfe, I don't experience much trouble composing to the frame, whatever it is, and I generally (but not always) print with minimal cropping.

  2. #12

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    I advice: Don't let the camera determine the shape of your final composition in print. You decide the shape of your final composition in print.

    Analogy: Just because a bucket has a round opening, this doesn't mean I can't put square, rectangular or triangular items into the bucket. It doesn't mean that I can't use the bucket to make a square sand castle. The shape of the bucket has no bearing on the final composition. Nor does the shape of the negative used to make a print.

  3. #13
    Laurent's Avatar
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    As many, I usually trim the paper and used the strip for test strips. The exception is when I print 5x7, in which case I like to keep the large margin at the bottom.

    The Rolleiflex is the first camera with which I print the full frame most of the time, and with which I can compose easily.

    Laurent
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    My APUG Blog

  4. #14
    Rick A's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter what format I shoot, I compose for full frame, and print same. I trim my paper first for square format and use the off-fall for test strips.
    Rick A
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cesaraugusta View Post
    I advice: Don't let the camera determine the shape of your final composition in print. You decide the shape of your final composition in print.

    Analogy: Just because a bucket has a round opening, this doesn't mean I can't put square, rectangular or triangular items into the bucket. It doesn't mean that I can't use the bucket to make a square sand castle. The shape of the bucket has no bearing on the final composition. Nor does the shape of the negative used to make a print.
    It has.

    You do compose for the frame you happen to have.
    Composition is nothing but arranging things inside a frame, and you can do that equally well - differently, but equally well - throwing the same things around in different frames.
    You do run into things that will not sit good, no matter what you try, and then you compose to an imagined frame, and cut away the parts that are not part of the composition later.
    But you do compose, square, oblong in many different aspect ratios, and round even.

  6. #16
    fotch's Avatar
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    I usually looked at my 6x6 negative that they could be printed in the traditional rectangle either horizontal or vertical. More than enough negative to permit cropping. Same as with any negative in that they may not proportion out exactly to the print paper.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #17

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    I agree there with fotch, most definitely.

    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    It has.

    You do compose for the frame you happen to have. . . . .
    "I compose within the frame I have, and not for the frame I have." There's a difference.

    I have noticed, and I am amazed at how many folks believe that the shape of the negative must dictate the shape of the final print . . . a camera that produces a square negative must have the elements arranged within the framework as to produce a print that is also square. That may not be the case here in this thread . . . but, I make a point to place the elements desired well within the limits of the "camera's view" as to give me the option to print any orientation (or shape) desired. I do like ovals so. A camera that produces a square negative can easily be used to produce a panoramic image in print, if "we can think outside the box". ;-)
    Last edited by anon12345; 08-25-2010 at 04:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cesaraugusta View Post
    I agree there with fotch.

    I have noticed, and I am amazed at how many folks believe that the shape of the negative must dictate the shape of the final print . . . a camera that produces a square negative must have the elements arranged within the framework as to produce a print that is also square. That may not be the case here in this thread . . . but, I make a point to place the elements desired well within the limits of the "camera's view" as to give me the option to print any orientation desired. A camera that produces a square negative can easily be used to produce a panoramic image in print, if "we can think outside the box". ;-)
    Tell us this, how many different aspect ratios do you have in your portfolio?

    You seem to assume that people who compose inside a given frame do so because they don't understand how composition should work, and don't know that it could be done another way.

    Composition is not about a frame dictating how you arrange things inside it, but you dictating how things are arranged inside that frame. The world is not full of ready-founds, objects that have a natural frame around them. We do that to those objects. We arrange them inside a frame, any frame, such that it looks good.
    You see, that's called creativity.

  9. #19
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Tell us this, how many different aspect ratios do you have in your portfolio?

    You seem to assume that people who compose inside a given frame do so because they don't understand how composition should work, and don't know that it could be done another way.

    Composition is not about a frame dictating how you arrange things inside it, but you dictating how things are arranged inside that frame. The world is not full of ready-founds, objects that have a natural frame around them. We do that to those objects. We arrange them inside a frame, any frame, such that it looks good.
    You see, that's called creativity.
    Agreed. There's a kind of laziness not composing to the frame, and a lack of artistic confidence as well.

    Ian

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Tell us this, how many different aspect ratios do you have in your portfolio?

    You seem to assume that people who compose inside a given frame do so because they don't understand how composition should work, and don't know that it could be done another way.

    Composition is not about a frame dictating how you arrange things inside it, but you dictating how things are arranged inside that frame. The world is not full of ready-founds, objects that have a natural frame around them. We do that to those objects. We arrange them inside a frame, any frame, such that it looks good.
    You see, that's called creativity.
    Excellent. I can see we're in 100% agreement. And "Darn", I was looking for a good argument. ;-)

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