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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Laurent, US prices are way lower than EU/UK, that's always been the case. Sometimes in the UK we get stung for 21% approx VAT & Import duty on purchases from the US, that's levied on the postage/shipping as well.

    Based on UK/EU prices that kit is a bargain.

    Ian

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurent View Post
    Hello all,

    I'm afraid GAS attacks again. For years I've considered adding one MF to the herd (quite thin at the moment, one camera per format only). My dilemma is between an RB67 kit or a C330/C220 one.

    A gentleman is selling a kit made of C330F body, three lenses (80/2.8 "blue dot", 65/3.5 (looks black) and 135/4.5 chrome), two focusing screens, paramender 2, and a Manfrotto tripod (190B). He's asking €450 for this, which seems fair for me, if the set works as fine as it looks.

    I've recently discovered the square format with the Rolleiflex, and am happy with it so I'm not sure I need a bigger neg. Also of consideration for me is that the whole kit might weight as much as an RB67 body with one lens, which makes it quite portable in my book.

    I'd be happy to hear your opinions, particularly about the pricing.
    Since you have a Rollie, what do you gain from the C330F? Interchangeable lenses, a long built in baffle for close ups. The Rollei is more ergonomially designed then the C330F which has IMNOHO a high fiddle factor. The Rollei has better optics versus the need to buy multiple bodies for multiple focal lens. So, better optics and more ergonomic versus interchangeable lenses and close-up photography.

    Since you have a Rollie, what do you gain from the RB67? Again the Rollei has better optics. The RB67 has interchangeable lenses, no parallax issues, measures the light through the filters, polarizors are much easier to use, closes are possible through extension tubes, and you have a slightly different negative shape.

    There is your decision tree: I got rid of a complete C330F for a Hasselblad and never looked back so I would go with the RB67 for that reason plus the ones listed above. Question 1: How you will use the C330F versus the RB67? Question 2: Which will make you happier? That only you can answer.

    Steve
    PS: If you only own Rollei you could walk around with wide angle, 80mm, and telephoto Rolleis hanging from you neck as bling!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I've owned the a C330 kit very similar to the one you are looking at for many years. In just this last year, I also acquired an RB67.

    If you like working with a TLR, you will like the C330f. And a body plus three lens kit is very small and light. The lenses are good and I like how they handle.

    That being said, the RB67 is much more of a departure from what you currently use, so may add more variety to your options.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I had a C220F and lenses and it is a pretty nice system....I also used a 3001 tripod with it. It is plenty big enough for a C330. You won't be tilting it over on the side, no mirror and a leaf shutter. I never had a problem as long as I had the head locked down tight. It was pretty amazing how small and light a 3 lens kit can be with that system.

  5. #15

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    3001 has been fine for mine, too.

  6. #16
    Laurent's Avatar
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    Thanks all for your advises again. The tripod in it's 190B version is one I rejected for use with my EOS3 (I bought a 055 instead, pretty stable but a bit bulky), but it should be fine under a TLR.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Since you have a Rollie, what do you gain from the C330F? Interchangeable lenses, a long built in baffle for close ups. The Rollei is more ergonomially designed then the C330F which has IMNOHO a high fiddle factor. The Rollei has better optics versus the need to buy multiple bodies for multiple focal lens. So, better optics and more ergonomic versus interchangeable lenses and close-up photography.

    Since you have a Rollie, what do you gain from the RB67? Again the Rollei has better optics. The RB67 has interchangeable lenses, no parallax issues, measures the light through the filters, polarizors are much easier to use, closes are possible through extension tubes, and you have a slightly different negative shape.
    Not sure my Rolleiflex has better optics since it's a 3.5B about 54 years old, but I'm quite happy with it (at least I could not find issues with it's sharpness).
    The 330F would give me a 2.8 lens that I miss sometimes when photographing in available light, plus interchangeable lenses and -may be- better close up
    facilities (I use Rolleinars, and they are quite easy to use, not sure a Paramender would be as efficient).
    The RB is something I lusted after for years, even before I even shot my first 120 film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    There is your decision tree: I got rid of a complete C330F for a Hasselblad and never looked back so I would go with the RB67 for that reason plus the ones listed above. Question 1: How you will use the C330F versus the RB67? Question 2: Which will make you happier? That only you can answer.

    Steve
    PS: If you only own Rollei you could walk around with wide angle, 80mm, and telephoto Rolleis hanging from you neck as bling!
    I know I'm french, but "bling-bling" is not for all of us

    P.S. If I really consider my options and try to be serious, then I have the feeling I should 1) test Delta 3200 for real speed in X-Tol and be sure I use every ISO it can give me for the available light situations and 2) buy a light and stable tripod (Gitzo something) and make sure I always have it with me when I carry the Rolleiflex... Don't know if I'll be serious !

    Laurent
    Laurent

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  7. #17

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    For handheld close-ups, it can be a toss-up between a rollei with rolleinar and the Mamiya; depending on the circumstances, one or the other might be preferable, but both present challenges. Tripod-mounted, the paramender is the ultimate solution, and I think most C-series users should have one.

    And to give the counterpoint I always give to the claim Sirius always makes about the Mamiya TLRs being "fiddly," many users, including myself, simply don't understand what he's talking about. No more or less "fiddly" than his vaunted Hasselblad. (one of which I'd love to have, mind you, but not to replace my TLR...)

    Contrary to what he says, you can see the aperture and shutter settings from the waist-level position (with the black lenses, not the chrome). To operate, you can support the camera with the left hand, focus with either hand, and make adjustments, fire the shutter, and wind the crank with the right hand. There is no "tossing the camera back and forth between your hands to operate," which is something I've heard people say about TLRs in general. You can even continue to focus the camera (left hand) while adjusting the shutter or aperture with the right; try that with a Hassy. I find the camera particularly ergonomic, frankly, if somewhat bulky compared to my Rollei.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgentX View Post
    And to give the counterpoint I always give to the claim Sirius always makes about the Mamiya TLRs being "fiddly," many users, including myself, simply don't understand what he's talking about. No more or less "fiddly" than his vaunted Hasselblad. (one of which I'd love to have, mind you, but not to replace my TLR...)
    I has a Porro Prism, not the WLF so I was not looking down from the top. I had all black lenses - some cock when the film was wound, some did not.

    Quote Originally Posted by AgentX View Post
    Contrary to what he says, you can see the aperture and shutter settings from the waist-level position (with the black lenses, not the chrome). To operate, you can support the camera with the left hand, focus with either hand, and make adjustments, fire the shutter, and wind the crank with the right hand. There is no "tossing the camera back and forth between your hands to operate," which is something I've heard people say about TLRs in general. You can even continue to focus the camera (left hand) while adjusting the shutter or aperture with the right; try that with a Hassy. I find the camera particularly ergonomic, frankly, if somewhat bulky compared to my Rollei.
    I disagree. On the Hasselblad, I set the EV and if necessary rotate both rings to change the shutter speed. The Rollei handles better than the C330. Also the Rollei has Zeiss optics. I have a circa 1935 folder with Zeiss optics which are still really sharp!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    Well, some people blow their tops when I point out that a Leica is--quantifiably--more complex to reload than an SLR. So we all have our prejudices.

    And I don't want to get into a tit-for-tat, really, just point out that not everyone finds Mamiya TLRs awkward to use. And to me, it's different than a Rollei but no better or worse. I'll agree with you that most any TLR with a prism is awkward for any number of reasons; they're optimized for use with a WLF. Then again, so is a Hasselblad, IMHO...

  10. #20
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    If I had the money, and everything is in good shape, I'd go for it, though maybe after haggling a bit (400 Euros, maybe). It may not be the best deal on such a kit ever, but you will certainly get your money's worth. I was close to saying go for it as I read through the list, but when I got to the Paramender 2, it was sealed. It is an invaluable tool for the system, and they usually sell for close to $100 U.S. by themselves.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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