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  1. #11
    altair's Avatar
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    All, thanks for all the very helpful & informative replies, I appreciate it very much. CGW, your info on the min focusing distance for both lenses is very welcome, thanks. JPorter, can you tell me where to get a +1 closeup lens for the M645? I think i might need one.

    Looks like I'll splurge and get both the 80 and 110. The 80 is indeed very cheap. I just love the 80 on my C220, i find it to be sharp as heck and I'm hoping the one for the 646 will be too. If I manage to scrounge a bit more money, I might get the 55 too.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by altair View Post
    All, thanks for all the very helpful & informative replies, I appreciate it very much. CGW, your info on the min focusing distance for both lenses is very welcome, thanks. JPorter, can you tell me where to get a +1 closeup lens for the M645? I think i might need one.

    Looks like I'll splurge and get both the 80 and 110. The 80 is indeed very cheap. I just love the 80 on my C220, i find it to be sharp as heck and I'm hoping the one for the 646 will be too. If I manage to scrounge a bit more money, I might get the 55 too.
    altair:

    To give you some perspective on these close focus issues, I just did a rough check on the close focus capability of my 110 mm lens. At closest focus, a subject that is 36 cm x 47 cm fills the viewfinder. In comparison, the UK site for Mamiya indicates that at closest focus, the 80mm lens covers a subject that is 28 cm x 38 cm.

    As for the closeup filters, there are lots on eBay - here is a Hong Kong example (not sure if they ship to Malaysia):

    http://cgi.ebay.ca/58mm-Close-Up-Len...item3360976f56
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    CGW
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    With respect, I'd skip el cheapo close-up sets. Bluntly put, they're junk. For close-up diopters, go for the dual element types from, say, Canon or Nikon. Nikon makes a 62mm(5T or 6T) diopter. Use a step ring to adapt it to your 58mm Mamiya lenses. Problem is, they're not cheap nor totally easy to find since Nikon discontinued them a few years ago. Though it will cost you about 1.5 stops, a Mamiya extension tube might be the mostest for the leastest when it comes to decreasing minimum focus distance. They're usually about $20-40 on the big auction site. Here's one:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/MAMIYA-M645-PRO-...item35abf6bfda

  4. #14
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    CGW is right about the relative quality of extension tubes vs. close-up sets.

    I look at the close-up sets as emergency backups, when you need to pare the size and weight of your kit to a minimum, or need to switch them on and off fast.

    In fact, I don't know that I can easily locate the close-up lens I have for my 645 equipment - it has been used so infrequently.

    I have other MF cameras that have built in bellows and are therefore better suited to switching back and forth between distant work and close-up work. If I did a lot more close-up work, and needed to use my 645 equipment for it, I'd consider a macro lens instead.

    By the way, I find that the minimum focus distance on the 110mm lens is fine for head and shoulder portraits.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15

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    One thing OP *can* do is to obtain a set of close-up RINGS. They can be had for about 100 dollars US for set of 3. When all of them are used at the same time, with 80mm, you can focus as close as to obtain 1:1, which is pretty darn close.... I have a set.

    One thing to keep in mind is that they are pain in a butt. One must remove the lens, attach the ring, then reattach the whole thing to the body. The larger ring used, more close up, but it also hinders the ability to focus far. So one can get into a situation where you can't get FAR enough. Then you must take it apart, remove the ring, then reattach, then recompose.

    Quality isn't hindered because there are no optics in extension rings. They are just hollow.

    I *think* if one would want to focus close, the real macro lens are the way to go. Anything else, you'll have to compromise somewhere.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #16
    CGW
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    "One thing to keep in mind is that they are pain in a butt. One must remove the lens, attach the ring, then reattach the whole thing to the body. The larger ring used, more close up, but it also hinders the ability to focus far. So one can get into a situation where you can't get FAR enough. Then you must take it apart, remove the ring, then reattach, then recompose."

    Ever actually used these? Extension tubes and/or diopters are for close-up work when infinity focus, er, isn't really a concern. Yes, you have to put 'em on and take 'em off-yup.

  7. #17

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    Yes... I used these... just a week ago in fact. That time, I was chasing butterflies with it - One shot, I had the butterfly in extreme macro. That required the largest one. I wanted then to include what was around it - another flower. I backed off only a foot or so. Now, the focus range wasn't big enough to maintain focus. I had to quickly remove the whole set, put a smaller one, and retry. Of course, by then, the subject has flown off.

    One does not need to try to focus to INFINITY to have this limitation. My point was, it's not a substitute for a real macro lens. I've been around long enough to know, with extension rings, one cannot focus on infinity. YES, I have used it.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #18
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    How does extension rings differ from extension tubes?

    tkamiya: Are close up rings = extension rings?

  9. #19

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    Get the 110 lens and get the other lens later on,

    Jeff

  10. #20
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    Extension Tube + 80mm Lens in my humble opinion.
    " A loving and caring heart is the beginning of all knowledge " ~ Thomas Carlyle ~

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