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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by michelleg View Post
    Is auto focus really necessary with kids or with practice would manual focus give consistent results?
    I have used a bronica SQ-A for shooting kids quite a bit and would say that it probably depends on how you're shooting them. If you're going for candids or active shots, then it can be a nightmare. If what you're doing is more formal and the children are heavily coached, then the manual focus is less of a problem.

    Running around after toddlers with your head bent to a waist level finder is a fine lesson in humility/frustration... not that I've ever done that

  2. #12
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG, Michelle.
    For smaller, active kids, you will always wish you had autofocus. The Contax 645 is a great camera, with awesome lenses, and a decent autofocus. Not F6 and new lenses quick but it will do the job in most situations. I have three backs, always loaded with different film, and it's just a pleasure. For a decent price, you can also get yourself an old manual focus Rollei and keep it for "not so small and active" children shoots, studio-type work....then there is the F6. Not much to be said there. A great camera all around, infallible matrix metering, built like a tank, fast autofocus, and plenty of lens choices from old to new Nikons, new Zeiss, Voigtlander, etc.
    Heck, even a Fuji 645i is a great medium format camera. Fixed (but great) lens and ok autofocus but it could serve its purpose as a backup camera as well.

    Good luck!

    Max

  3. #13

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    I want to confirm that SuzanneR would be a great resource on this question. I just heard her interview on Inside Analog Photo Radio. You might check it out. I believe she uses a big old lumber RZ67 and maybe a Mamiya 7, but not sure. And her website: http://suzannerevy.com/index.cfm

    I've got to say, a lot of my photography is of children (7 & 11 now) and I was inspired by Suzanne's interview to shoot the kids more with my MF SLR (Bronica). But 35 is certainly a bit easier, esp. with auto focus.
    Jeff Glass

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  4. #14
    papagene's Avatar
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    Michelle... look at SuzanneR's and Nicole's images here on APUG. They both use medium format quite often in their photos of children.

    Suzanne:
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=2670

    Nicole:
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=2762

    Happy viewing.
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
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    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  5. #15

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    Rolleiflex or other TLR (Mamiya if you like interchangeable lenses) is great for kids. In any case, I recommend a camera with a waist-level finder. You have to get used to a reversed image, but the camera positioning is great. All you need to do is think of where the real subject is rather than thinking about what's on the groundglass when kids are moving around. It's really not a problem (for me, anyhow) with a bit of practice.











    Edit: Oops, looks like the versions of some of these I had on Flickr were less-than-optimally-tuned. Sorry if they're a bit muddy in some cases, but I hope you get my idea...
    Last edited by AgentX; 10-26-2010 at 08:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I'd recommend a camera that allows you to switch back and forth between a prism finder and a waist level finder. Square format makes that a bit easier, because using a waist level finder to shoot something in portrait orientation is an exercise in altered realities .

    I shot a lot of weddings (which included a fair amount of candid photos of kids) using a Mamiya C330 with prism and waist level finders.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'd recommend a camera that allows you to switch back and forth between a prism finder and a waist level finder. Square format makes that a bit easier, because using a waist level finder to shoot something in portrait orientation is an exercise in altered realities .
    That's why you use an RB/RZ!

  8. #18
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    My son at age 4 shooting a photo of me with his Canon Sure Shot Owl. He now has a Nikon D70 (he uses digital because he's doing a lot of work making stop-motion animations with Lego bricks). I shot this with a Hasselblad and 80mm Planar C. More pics below







    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

    Become a fan of my work on Facebook

    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    No problem at all, but I recommend using a camera with bellows focusing for children likely to move around, so you can focus quickly. With my Bronica S2a, I found that my best setup for photographing my son when he was around two years old was with the bellows instead of a helical and a chimney finder--in other words, I'd turned it into a kind of 6x6 Graflex SLR, so I switched to using my 5x7" Press Graflex SLR and never turned back, at least with available light. It doesn't do flash sync easily, so with strobes, I prefer the Bronica.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20

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    I use Mamiya

    My kids are 5 and 2 and they are most of what I shoot these days. I use the Mamiya 7 and also the RZ67. Both work well, but chasing them down and nailing focus while they are moving can be a challenge. The RZ is better since it's an slr and focuses closer but the Mamiya 7 is lighter and better for hikes and wide-angle type portraits.

    I have a full EOS system but haven't used it much in the last year or two, just loving the results from MF too much.

    With the RZ I use it with the L-grip, the winder, and the AE prism. It makes shooting faster, though the rig is a lot heavier that way. The 110/2.8 is a superb portrait lens, and in fact just a great lens in general.

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