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  1. #21
    wy2l's Avatar
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    I have a Pentax 67 II (the latest version) with the AE meter. I found the meter to be extreamly accurate and makes the camera operate just like a modern 35mm film SLR. The 55-100 zoom lens is very sharp and a joy to use.

    I have had no problems with 'mirror slap', but the camera is heavy and my experience is that the system demands to be mounted on a tripod.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    haven't see trannys come off friend's 6x7 yet.
    Hi Gary, You have seen some of my 6x7 slides (Velvia 50). All of them were shot using the built-in meter of the P67II. I have a Sekonic spot meter too. But I leave it at home when using the Pentax. Best, Joachim

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joachim_I View Post
    Hi Gary, You have seen some of my 6x7 slides (Velvia 50). All of them were shot using the built-in meter of the P67II. I have a Sekonic spot meter too. But I leave it at home when using the Pentax. Best, Joachim
    Joachim, yours were the images I was thinking about. Like all meters its knowing how to use them.

  4. #24
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    Joachim, yours were the images I was thinking about. Like all meters its knowing how to use them.

    Touché. And SMB's mono images to date with the Sekonic have been bang-on form. Atta boy, Boots, skitch 'em! Show 'em how it's done!

    And — oh yes, Joachim, I can remember holding up the tranny sheet I think in ... hmm, Sin City some place; can't remember, but you were there... so was the Pentax... and a few other oddities (cameras, I mean!). Despite some earlier reservations, the 120 format appeals to me more than the 5x4 sheet film w/ field camera business, so speculatively eyeballing some 6x7s at the moment. How common are right angle finders for the Pentax?
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    the 120 format appeals to me more than the 5x4 sheet film w/ field camera business, so speculatively eyeballing some 6x7s at the moment. How common are right angle finders for the Pentax?
    Good to see that the P67 becomes kind of popular in our area. It is a great system. I guess the right angle finder is not too common. I got mine 2nd hand from B&H. It's great for macro.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    ... How common are right angle finders for the Pentax?
    I don't know how common they are, but I have found both a right-angle and straight (flip-up) magnifying attachment eyepieces to fit my K-series camera viewfinders. Unfortunately they won't fit the 6x7 as the viewfinder on that is of quite a different design.


    However, my M-series camera bodies will take my Olympus OM series right-angle finders, so two for one there!


    BTW, my 6x7 negs/prints are back. As I expected, the TTL ones are about 2 stops underexposed (though, surprisingly, still printable even if somewhat "moodily" dark and "painterly"), while the ones using hand-metering came out OK.

    Also, for several frames I used either a Hoya +2 or a +1 diopter(with the SMC 200/4 lens). The results were most satisfactory on the 6"x7" prints.

    I should have the AP6x7 back this Friday: cant wait!

    The 6x7 format, for me, is just so much more appealing than the 6x6: just that little bit of "headspace" in portrait orientation, I guess. The shots (all hand-held), so far, just blow me away (even the underexposed ones).

    BTW, "my" lab still uses silver halide technology for the prints, and quite affordable: I recommend them).
    Last edited by Galah; 11-09-2010 at 11:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27

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    How did your shots turn out, Galah?

    I have the Pentax 2x straight magnifier for the 6x7. You take off the eyepiece and screw it back in through a hinged flange, so you can flip it up. It allows very precise focusing but pretty much requires a tripod and slows the shooting down quite a lot. Installing and removing it also is slow and there's no way to safely store the camera with it installed. I recently got a split-prism screen installed and am looking forward to giving it a shot. I'm guessing the wides are going to be difficult to focus, but the 105 f/2.4 and the 150 f/2.8 seem to generate quite a bit of offset for the prism. For what it's worth, with a 75mm f/4.5 or a 55mm f/4 the prism doesn't darken until you get inside under poor lighting.

    On the whole prism debate, my two cents: the 6x7's TTL meter is ancient 60s technology. It's averaging, which isn't a problem as long as you are aware of what you are doing with it. It does draw a lot of current and will be the biggest drain on your batteries. There's apparently a version with a momentary switch (turns on for 10s when you push the switch) and one with a plain mechanical switch. I have the plain switch, and it's very easy to forget and leave the meter going. This will drain your batteries in ~24h. A spotmeter will let you do the zone system, it will let you use the lighter unmetered prism, and you only have to buy it once to use it with all your cameras. It's not as handy and you don't get the confidence-booster of seeing the little centered needle, though.

    Also, I am a proponent of the grip. I want to do some tests to be sure it's not affecting the sharpness, but if nothing else it is much easier to carry around. Get a big wide hippie camera strap too.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMD View Post
    How did your shots turn out, Galah?...

    ...Also, I am a proponent of the grip. I want to do some tests to be sure it's not affecting the sharpness, but if nothing else it is much easier to carry around. Get a big wide hippie camera strap too.
    Alright, regarding my shots, the first film was two to two and a half stops underexposed, however, the lab was still able to print them all even though most of them looked very dark and moody: quite "pictorial". I rather liked the effect.

    For the second film, I used a hand-held meter: the Gossen Lunasix-3.

    This second lot of shots came out pretty well (perhaps a touch dark for my personal taste) but good.

    Both sets of prints were enlarged to 6"x7" with fill-in, and I found them breathtaking (even those a bit/a lot dark).

    The vendor then "recalibrated" (whatever that meant) the meter for me, and the readings it now gives are about +1/2 stop above the Gossen's: which should be spot on for my taste . I am still in the process of finishing off a film using the recalibrated meter.

    I find the handle very "handy", but have noticed that the upper mounting/retaining screw tends to work loose in use (I am contemplating the use of some thread-locking fluid from my car tool box ("Locknut"?).

  9. #29
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    I just printed some images from my 90mm only to 8x10 but breathtakingly sharp.

  10. #30

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    Pentax 6x7: great first medium format camera

    The Pentax 6x7 (67) is a great first medium format camera because the glass is excellent and inexpensive. You will be able to collect a variety of focal lengths for well under the price of one Hasselblad portrait lens (another GREAT platform).

    The P67 platform is also modular so you can start with an inexpensive 6x7 and work your way to the 67ii. The metered prism is my personal favorite meter. Plusses -- principally in the quality of image -- are too numerous to mention. There is even a Shift lens in the large lens catalog.

    The camera's shortcomings -- mainly its awkward bulk and difficulty loading film -- are merely things most of us get used to. Diane Arbus shot this camera hand held and she was about 5 feet tall.

    I also find that the mirror slap problem is mostly psychological. The mirror slap is LOUD! Humorously loud. Like closing the trunk of a 1962 Checker Cab. However, my bad shots are mostly from hand-shake because I've observed that the shutter goes before the mirror clatters home. (This is with Tri-X 320 or 400; I would use a tripod and mirror lock-up if I had 50 or 100 for landscape or architecture.)

    Chris Wilson

    Karen Nakamura

    A classic platform deserving of its longevity. My highest recommendation.
    Last edited by Samuel West Hiser; 11-23-2010 at 08:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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