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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel West Hiser View Post
    ...difficulty loading film ...
    .
    A lot of people say this, but I can't see it: no more difficult than the older, manual slrs, in my opinion.

    I have only shot about 5 films so far: no difficulty with hand-held.

    BTW, the vendor fixed the TTL metering and it worked spot on . However, I myself then messed up the meter on/off switch, by attempting a bit of DIY maintenance (it was working itself loose), and it's back with the repairman .

    I'll know whether my DIY attempt has proven to be remediable -or not- tomorrow.

  2. #32
    kingkristjan's Avatar
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    I agree that the mirror slap is loud and intimidating but at the same time, it's not the mirror that causes shake...it's the shutter! Even with mirror lock-up, the shutter throws quite a lateral kick. I find that if you just hold the camera very firmly, it's hand holdable down to a 30th/sec.

  3. #33

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    I have three. And while mirror slap is less of an issue hand-held, it does show up in images made on a tripod, especially when using longer lenses, so I'd recommend a model with MLU.

    I meter strictly with a spot meter, mainly because all my work is transparency film though know people who did just fine with the TTL.

    Also have the right angle finder (rigid magnifier) which I bought for macro work. There is a pop up right angle finder that would be more portable, but I found the optical quality of the rigid finder to be better and easier to use. It comes with a small case, and removal, I found is easy. Squeeze the two buttons on either side of the top of the camera and it comes off. A molded plastic insert covers the ground glass when the finder is removed, and another covers the bottom of the finder.

    A couple of thoughts on performance. The stock focusing screen was really dark. I replaced mine with a Beattie screen, with a grid. Much brighter and the gridlines are helpful.

    The weak link with these cameras is the film advance system. Advance the film smoothly and cautiously or you may strip the gears. This happened for a variety of reasons. Commonly, the film and its wrapping paper on the take up spool might not have wound as tight as it should (poor loading technique) and it bound at the end of the roll. I also had a couple of situations where the film adhered to the pressure plate due to humidity when working in extreme conditions. Now that I know the symptom, if it binds, I put the camera in a dark bag and pop the back open to free things up.

    I had the film advance system fixed three times over the years. But, the reason I have three 67s is they are great cameras with wonderful optics. Enjoy yours!

  4. #34

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    hello

    I have a question for people who have a grip for pentax 67
    Can someone give me the dimensions of this bracket?
    I gave the link with the indications

    http://a.imageshack.us/img704/2350/temp01o.jpg

  5. #35

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    I would not go out of your way to procure a metered prism. All directly-read in-camera meters (or any meters that are composition-based) are at best a compromise between a hand held meter and no meter at all. If the camera comes with one, and all the little meter doodads do not get in the way of your composition (as I feel that they do on many cameras), fine. But don't pay extra for something that will make your pictures worse if used.

    The most fool-proof, simple, and accurate general-purpose meter will be an incident meter. The most precise (not accurate, but precise) tonal rendition would be achieved with a spot meter (or any reflected meter that you get close enough to what you want to meter – the "spot" aspect just makes it much easier to meter narrow areas quickly and from a distance). However, you need to have a very good idea of what you are doing for a spot meter to work well. You need to, at the very least, understand tonal placement (meaning that you almost never use the meter's indicated exposure), and ideally you would understand development alterations to go along with the tonal placement.

    Quote Originally Posted by kswatapug View Post
    I have three. And while mirror slap is less of an issue hand-held, it does show up in images made on a tripod, especially when using longer lenses, so I'd recommend a model with MLU.
    Are you sure it is mirror slap and not shutter vibration? The mirror is pretty well damped, but that is a big FP shutter.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galah View Post
    ...I'll know whether my DIY attempt has proven to be remediable -or not- tomorrow.
    Praise the Lord! It's back, fixed and in working order.

    However, I'm still in the process of finishing off the film, so I haven't got any actual negtives/prints since having the camera returned.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    ...I would not go out of your way to procure a metered prism. All directly-read in-camera meters (or any meters that are composition-based) are at best a compromise between a hand held meter and no meter at all. If the camera comes with one, and all the little meter doodads do not get in the way of your composition (as I feel that they do on many cameras), fine. But don't pay extra for something that will make your pictures worse if used...
    A very good point.

    In the case of older cameras (such as the AP6x7, the SP-F, and the Olympus OM-1 and OM-2), you must use the TTL exposure meter "intelligently" for best results. (Treat it as if it were a hand-held, reflected light meter, and you should be OK)

    As regards TTL metering (with these cameras), personally, I usually adjust the exposure to what I consider to be a substitute mid-grey object (grass, dirt, weathered bitumen, mulch or wood chips -mind out for and avoid glare) then shoot whatever,as the other tones simply fall into place and are taken care of automatically (as is side and backlighting).

    The advantage of the built in meter, I find, is not so much that it gives an "automatically" good exposure (as many d****** P&Ss are capable of doing these days), but that the meter is convenient, or "ready to hand", as needed, and you don't necessarily need to carry another gadget aboout with you -though you can, if you choose to do so.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Are you sure it is mirror slap and not shutter vibration? The mirror is pretty well damped, but that is a big FP shutter.
    Try setting the camera up on a tripod with a laser strapped to the lens. Trip the shutter in each instance and see how much movement there is when the mirror isn't locked up vs. when it is.

  9. #39

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    In the Photo.net Pentax 6x7 forum, there are several threads concerning the issue of hand-held and mirror-induced shake. One -in particular- with many images, describes a lengthy motorcycle tour through South America (over many dirt roads and several crashes). Two things emerged:

    *The 6x7 is very tough and came through unscathed.

    *Almost all of the shots were taken hand-held and shutter/mirror-induced shake was not an issue.

    If you use MLU, you are immediately tied to a tripod: how else can you frame your shot?
    Last edited by Galah; 11-30-2010 at 11:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #40
    whlogan's Avatar
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    What these guys said..... exactly.... I've had both 67 and 6x7 and the differences and small. the 67II must be the bees knees.... but you won't go wrong. Prism meters can be over riden with a hand held meter at any time, so get the prism meter and use it where you want to... I do
    Logan

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