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  1. #31
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I shoot it instead of 35 when I want sharpness and fine grain in standard size prints (8x10 and 11x14), and when I can get what I need using a slightly slower and less convenient camera, with slower lenses. I shoot it instead of sheet film when 4x5 is overkill in quality, or difficult or impossible to shoot due to timing. I probably split my shooting between small and medium format 50/50. Sheet film I will just shoot now and again, though I used to shoot it much, much more. I mostly use 35 for low light and casual shooting, though I often shoot it just for the lovely look it gives. FWIW, most of my favorite personal work has been shot on 35mm. This is pretty much because the 35 is the camera best suited to many of my favorite things to shoot, not because I am claiming that 35mm is superior, or is "my favorite" format. I just think that much of the subject matter that I find interesting lends itself well to being shot with a small, fast, and easily portable camera that does well in low light hand held situations.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 11-19-2010 at 07:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top-Cat View Post
    So I'm asking: when do you shoot medium format?
    ...
    I'm thinking, how do you set yourself up for shooting medium format, how do you visualize a medium format picture - how do you manage to haul around a bigger camera that still allows you to see what you're doing without the size of it getting in your way?
    For me, MF is the perfect balance between the format advantages of LF (tonality, detail, enlargement factor, larger view of the scene) and the ease of use of 35mm (quick, ready to go with many shots, nimble).

    Visualization feels about the same for me, across all formats. I don't hunt for photographs in my viewfinders or on the ground glass. If nothing else, a larger camera trains you to do a more efficient job of scouting!

    Some people feel that an MF or LF camera really comes between them and the subject. I suppose that is because they are trying to use the camera to find the subject, something that I find very inefficient and uncomfortable. Better to train your eyes and your imagination than your forearms.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #33

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    i don't really have a reason for using one camera instead of another. i am not
    interested in sharpness or the resolution ( i couldn't care less )
    that everyone rants and raves about when they do the whole "tech talk" thing.

    i just grab whatever might be handy and that i have film for ( or loaded into holders ).
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

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  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by theoria View Post
    I'm doing MF street photography. I am a former digital shooter, converted to film due the way it looks and then to MF, because of the way it handles perspective and DOF.
    How does it handle perspective differently other than different DOF to focal length ratio? I seem to find it somewhat equally difficult to find a bellows or shift lens for both cameras, though there might be some chance it might be slightly more available for MF and I haven't found it yet.

    Also, I'm curious if I'm right in MF being a way of getting faster lenses all over due to the size - my reasoning for that being that the grain of a 400 film will, due to the size of any medium format behave more like a 100 ISO film on 35mm and thus you get the speed of 400 ISO on 2.8, which is more like 100 with 1.4 on 35mm otherwise?

    Am I wrong to think you can get away with faster film on MF (I find I often like 400 ISO B&W both because grain has a different look on film as well as I also get a slightly better contrast out of it).

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I just picked up from the lab a roll of Ektachrome 100GX that I shot in my Mamiya 645 Pro. Once you have looked at medium format slides on a light box, you'll have one answer to the OP's question. If you can then turn around and project them, you'll have an even better one.
    I forgot about chromes. I only have 35mm slide projectors too... I used to shoot mostly chromes for color, just loved them but chromes are a pain to get processed around here now, not great results what I had done last year so I've dropped them for now. I love that they are the shot I took, no post processing can save them if they are wrong, thus chromes are the purest image in my opinion.

    I do love looking at medium and large chromes on the light box from other guys but I couldn't do anything else with them!
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    I forgot about chromes. I only have 35mm slide projectors too... I used to shoot mostly chromes for color, just loved them but chromes are a pain to get processed around here now, not great results what I had done last year so I've dropped them for now. I love that they are the shot I took, no post processing can save them if they are wrong, thus chromes are the purest image in my opinion.

    I do love looking at medium and large chromes on the light box from other guys but I couldn't do anything else with them!
    It took a fair bit of looking, but I found a medium format projector at a reasonable price ($200.00) at a store that has a history of charging too much for used equipment .

    I think that the projector gives me more benefit than $200.00 would give me if spent on a new lens.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #37

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    I like MF for any situation when I think I'm going to be in a target-rich environment. MF allows me to work faster than a view camera. I can make more pictures in a day, and it's easier to manage when jumping in-and-out of a car on a road trip. I prefer LF for situations where I think I'm likely to find only a few images during an outing. 35mm has fallen to the bottom of my list, only one notch above digital. I only own old manual-focus Canons, and my eyes ain't what they used to be. I'd rather use a bigger format any time.

    Peter Gomena

  8. #38

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    In comparison with smaller formats, because it uses longer lenses to achieve the same angle of view, the main subject and the objects in the foreground and background appear closer, thus "compressing perspective". This is an effect that I find compositionally advantageous. As regards DOF, for isntance a 80mm@2.8 normal MF lens has a dof of 35 cm, which is shallower than the 45mm of a 50mm@1.4 on a 35mm camera (both focused at 3m), but what i like most is the quality of the bokeh you can achieve on MF (this might be partly subjective, but the sheer principles of optics have certainly something to do with it).
    As regards film speed, yes, the grain is less visible at the same ISO in MF. BTW Ilford Delta 3200 looks very good in 6x6 format. See for instance the photo below (developed in an almost ehausted microphen solution):



    Quote Originally Posted by Top-Cat View Post
    How does it handle perspective differently other than different DOF to focal length ratio? I seem to find it somewhat equally difficult to find a bellows or shift lens for both cameras, though there might be some chance it might be slightly more available for MF and I haven't found it yet.

    Also, I'm curious if I'm right in MF being a way of getting faster lenses all over due to the size - my reasoning for that being that the grain of a 400 film will, due to the size of any medium format behave more like a 100 ISO film on 35mm and thus you get the speed of 400 ISO on 2.8, which is more like 100 with 1.4 on 35mm otherwise?

    Am I wrong to think you can get away with faster film on MF (I find I often like 400 ISO B&W both because grain has a different look on film as well as I also get a slightly better contrast out of it).
    Last edited by theoria; 11-20-2010 at 05:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by theoria View Post
    In comparison with smaller formats, because it uses longer lenses to achieve the same angle of view, the main subject and the objects in the foreground and background appear closer, thus "compressing perspective".

    They don't.
    Same angle of view, same position, same perspective.
    Different angle of view, same position, still the same perspective.

    You get "compressed perspective" in the 'far away' parts of a scene.
    It's there in superwide and wide pictures, though very small.
    It's there in the normal lens pictures.
    It's there in tele lens pictures, too.
    The difference is that with increasing focal length, the angle of view decreases, and you are (or rather: could be) cropping to the far away bits.

    Now what you do when putting a longer lens on a MF camera is make sure that, from the same location (important), the larger frame is 'filled' with the same angle of view as a shorter lens on a smaller format camera.
    As such, it produces no difference, compared to the shorter lens on a smaller format. Why, it's even meant to keep things the same: the longer lens restricts the view to what you would get on a smaller format.


    The only way to change perspective is to change position relative to the subject. You can compress perspective using a wide angle lens by moving away from your subject.
    You then get lots of perhaps uninteresting stuff surrounding your subject in the frame. And you then select a longer lens to crop that unnecessary stuff away and enlarge the bit you are interested in.
    But the working bit re perspective is not the longer lens, but the moving away bit, the changing position part.

  10. #40
    jp498's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theoria View Post
    As regards film speed, yes, the grain is less visible at the same ISO in MF. BTW Ilford Delta 3200 looks very good in 6x6 format. See for instance the photo below (developed in an almost ehausted microphen solution):
    That does look good. I wouldn't have bothered with film in such low light not knowing about that.

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