Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,770   Posts: 1,484,239   Online: 1101
      
Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 66
  1. #41

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bucharest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    53
    Thanks Q.G. for correcing me. For the most part of this year, since I picked up medium format, I lived with this impression. I guess it was bad explanation for the changes I saw in the way objects seem to be arranged in the frame. Is it the use of WLF? The compositional demands of the square format? The fact that the vertical and horizontal angle of view are the same, so what involuntarily makes into the frame is different? I have no clear answer yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    They don't.
    Same angle of view, same position, same perspective.
    Different angle of view, same position, still the same perspective.
    .

  2. #42
    agfarapid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    178
    Images
    8
    I think the OP's question goes to the heart of photography: How we see or pre-visualize a photo. Like the OP I sometimes spend more time deciding which camera (35mm, MF-- folder, SLR or TLR, etc.) For me, it's a function of if I'm shooting for a specific purpose (people, things, or landscapes) or just driving around with a camera in the trunk (walking around usually isn't much of an option since my location is more rural/suburban). That being said, most of my shooting is with MF because I enjoy the larger negative size and (for me) far greater tonal quality and gradation with b&w. My camera of choice will usually be my Fuji 645 GS folder or my Mamiya C33 TLR with a 65mm wide angle. I do tend to fall in or out of love with one camera or system at any moment in time. Last moth I was shooting primarily with my 35's because I felt guilty since I hadn't used them in months and since I recently bought a 100 ft roll of Legacy 100! Last week I was shooting sunsets with my Mamiya 645 kit because I needed to use a longer than normal lens, in this case a 150. Ultimately, the real answer to the question is that "it all depends"...

  3. #43
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,614
    Images
    151
    My rule is pretty simple: medium format if I can use a tripod and 35mm if not. It is a nice change now and then to shoot 35 for me just to shoot that crazy 6x9 aspect ratio!

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    I don't hunt for photographs in my viewfinders or on the ground glass.
    Some people feel that an MF or LF camera really comes between them and the subject. I suppose that is because they are trying to use the camera to find the subject, something that I find very inefficient and uncomfortable. Better to train your eyes and your imagination than your forearms.
    What you say is very true. Not only because it sounds sensible, but because I've had the habit of doing exactly that: -Hunting for photographs in the viewfinder. It simply doesn't work. These days when I find an interesting area, I leave the gear in the car and walk around with a piece of cardboard that I've cut a square hole in and look through that. If I like what I see I return to the car and bring with me either my Rolleicord or my Bronica ETRSi-gear. In this way the camera becomes a tool and no longer gets in the way between me and the subject.

  5. #45

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    They don't.
    Same angle of view, same position, same perspective.
    Different angle of view, same position, still the same perspective.

    You get "compressed perspective" in the 'far away' parts of a scene.
    It's there in superwide and wide pictures, though very small.
    It's there in the normal lens pictures.
    It's there in tele lens pictures, too.
    The difference is that with increasing focal length, the angle of view decreases, and you are (or rather: could be) cropping to the far away bits.

    Now what you do when putting a longer lens on a MF camera is make sure that, from the same location (important), the larger frame is 'filled' with the same angle of view as a shorter lens on a smaller format camera.
    As such, it produces no difference, compared to the shorter lens on a smaller format. Why, it's even meant to keep things the same: the longer lens restricts the view to what you would get on a smaller format.


    The only way to change perspective is to change position relative to the subject. You can compress perspective using a wide angle lens by moving away from your subject.
    You then get lots of perhaps uninteresting stuff surrounding your subject in the frame. And you then select a longer lens to crop that unnecessary stuff away and enlarge the bit you are interested in.
    But the working bit re perspective is not the longer lens, but the moving away bit, the changing position part.
    That's pretty much the way I understand it as well, being into drawing from the start I'm somewhat familiar with linear perspective, so I've spent some time thinking of the correlation between focal length and linear perspective/ perspective distortion - considering theorias answer there, I think he's a little confused as to certain aspects of perspective distortion (which makes me think of something I read about perspective distortion in the book "Light, Science and Magic" stating that the perspective distortion isn't related to focal length in itself, but the angle of view compared to the viewers relation to the subject).

    Anyway, theoria DID make me consider one thing, considering there's less barrel distortion in shorter focal length - doesn't that imply that you get a more rectilinear than curvilinear perspective distortion using MF due to their generally longer focal lengths?

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Dang!
    I wrote a lengthy reply, and when i clicked the Post button, i ended up in the untethered flash on a Rollei thread!

    It's an angle of view/lens design thing, not a focal length thing.
    Lenses on larger formats have longer focal lengths to keep the same angle of view.
    A wide angle lens on a larger format has a longer focal length than a wide angle lens having the same angle of view on a smaller format. Yet both are wide angle lenses, with the same wide angle lens design. And the same distortion issues.
    So no: the fact that lenses on larger formats are longer does not mean they suffer less barrel or pin cushion distortion.

    Compressed perspective, by the way, is not a distortion. It is real, true.
    The fact that it seems odd is due to the fact that we, with our relatively wide angled eyes, do not see it in isolation. It's taken out of context. But not distorted.
    Just lke converging lines: we have no issue with them when they are horizontals, yet think them strange, wrong even, when they are vertical. Yet we see them without noticing them every time we look up at a tall structure. But that's because they are in context then. See them wihout physically looking up, and we think they are odd.
    Purely a context thing. So don't be too hasty applying a term like "distortion" to it. Because it's not.

  7. #47
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,591
    Images
    59
    The perspective doesn't change between formats, but the depth of field does.

    Assuming same angle of view and aperture, smaller formats will exhibit more depth of field.

    There may also be some important differences arising from the larger viewing screens in MF SLRs - even if they are "only" psychological differences.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #48
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,591
    Images
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Dang! ....
    Q.G.:

    I never took you for a Country and Western fan
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The perspective doesn't change between formats, but the depth of field does.

    Assuming same angle of view and aperture, smaller formats will exhibit more depth of field.
    Until you blow the smaller format up to a same size print as that of the larger format picture.
    Then it's the same again.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Q.G.:

    I never took you for a Country and Western fan

    The thing i wrote first... And i'm not even considering letting you know what i said first.
    And "dang" was the next best 'real word' (as opposed to *@&$%#) that came up in my head.
    So i must be.

    What can i say? I'm full of surprises.

Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin