Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,844   Online: 1088
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36

Thread: Hassey vs SL66

  1. #11
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    728
    Images
    21
    Okay, Q.G. sorry, I should have rather stated "as most Hasselblads do not". But to be realistic, the overwhelming majority of Hasselblad cameras that are around belong to the 500-system. It seems to me that the 200/2000-system is quite rare and the cameras are very pricey, even by today, so I didn┤t mention them.

    Best, Benjamin

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Jed Freudenthal View Post
    I fully agree. I now have an SL 66 for about 35 years and I have chosen it at that time for its dependability. The Hassies were usually in the repairshop. May be the Hassis of that age or not around anymore.

    Jed
    That's just nonsense.
    If anything, it's the other way round, and the SL 66s enjoy a bit of a reputation for being fond of the repair shop a bit too much.

    One thing can be said without hesitation is that there are very many Hasselblads in use today that are quite a bit older than the oldest still working SL 66.
    Easy, that, since they have an 18 years headstart. And because they are second to none regarding build-quality.

    And now that i'm well and truly 'in' this thread: that's the bit i'd say.
    SL 66, while good cameras, are - as any SL 66 owner would confirm - a bit (!) of a gamble. They always have been, from the very beginning.

    They are bigger and heavier too.

    You have to like the ergonomics, with (just like the Rolleiflexes) controls on both sides of the camera: you need three hands: two to operate the controls, one to hold the camera.

    (And, Slixtiesix, they are much rarer than 2000/200 series Hasselblads. )

    But i wouldn't say they are bad.

  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    If you could do what you need with a larger and slightly "fiddlier" camera, the Mamiya RB or RZ system may be a good compromise for those who want most of the benefits of a Hasselblad, plus a built-in bellows. There are also 6x6 backs for these cameras.

    over the SL66, I'd even be tempted to go with a Hasselblad for its benefits and a separate Mamiya C-something with a Paramender if I just had to have a camera with a built-in bellows. The C-series cameras are very cheap now, and they, along with an RZ, have kept me from wanting a Hasselblad (which is a good thing $$$).
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    728
    Images
    21
    Okay Q.G., you really brought some good points. Yes, the SL can be a bit awkward to use, especially with the more heavy lenses. I must admit that. If they are really rarer than the 200-series - I don┤t know...
    However, here is my killer-argument for you tonight:
    The 200-series surely marks the peak of Hasselbladanian camera-building, because after some 40 years and many dead end trials with their metallic foil-shutters, they finally realised that the cloth-focal-plane shutter - exactly as it had been used in the SL66 for more than two decades by then - was the only way for them to construct a durable and reliable focal-plane-shutter.

    Good Night Benjamin

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,125
    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    The SL66 is still a great camera and I┤m a big fan of it. The bellow is a huge advantage if you are doing macro and portraiture. With a Hasselblad, you have to use extension tubes if you want to get closer to the subject. With the SL66, you can do this effortlessly.
    Quote Originally Posted by epavelin View Post
    I tested both systems recently. The SL66 is a wonderfully made camera, with some excellent design features - the bellows and tilt are of course the stars of the show and make it a great system for close-ups and landscapes.
    But there is still time for your to buy the FlexBody and use all your Hasselblad lenses! That will give you swing and tilt!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    jmcd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    715
    Images
    41
    The SL66 is the one camera I regret selling. The downside is that fewer lenses and accessories are available compared to other cameras, qualified repair people and parts are few, and if you do jam the camera it will very likely need to be serviced by one of those repair people. Otherwise, I think it is a joy to work with. I wish I shared the same fondness for the RB67.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    67
    Images
    1
    Years ago I purchased an SL66 instead of a Hassey. I loved the camera and regret eventually selling it. I loved the tilt feature it had. Great for landscape photography. Never had to worry about depth of field. Optics were as good as Hassey. Same lens if I recall. If I had a choice I would still prefer the SL66, mainly because of the bellows and tilt features.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    252
    I still have two SL66 systems that I acquired in the mid 1970's, and they have never needed repairs. However, being nervous after 25 years of faithful service, I did send them for a CLA to Brett Weston's former Rollei person (Jurgen) and they are no doubt good for another 25 years.

    It was Brett who first introduced me to the camera, and his love of the system is legendary. What he was particularly excited about were the tilt and bellows, and the extremely sharp lenses. The system is my favorite for the same reasons.

    I have nothing negative to say about the SL66 system, and must add that I have no experience with the Hassey camera.

    www.mergross.com

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    The 200-series surely marks the peak of Hasselbladanian camera-building, because after some 40 years and many dead end trials with their metallic foil-shutters, they finally realised that the cloth-focal-plane shutter - exactly as it had been used in the SL66 for more than two decades by then - was the only way for them to construct a durable and reliable focal-plane-shutter.
    Absolutely right.

    The irony of it all: they had considered cloth shutters right from the start (quite common back then) but dismissed it right from the start also, because Victor wanted to avoid problems due to the sun burning holes in cloth. (Apparently also something not uncommon? Leica and other rangefinders?)
    So it just had to be something else. So even though they put someone on the problem the moment they changed to leaf shutters, it kept the focal plane shutter out of Hasselblads for some 20 years. Silly.


    Say, you know a bit about SL 66s: can you say something about the problems that befall SL 66 and SL 66 E cameras?

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    530
    Images
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Say, you know a bit about SL 66s: can you say something about the problems that befall SL 66 and SL 66 E cameras?
    No
    I have a SL66 now for about five years now. I got it CLA'd shortly after I bought it, just to be sure.

    Ulrich

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin