Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,705   Posts: 1,482,767   Online: 1086
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36

Thread: Hassey vs SL66

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    524
    Images
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    That's just nonsense.
    If anything, it's the other way round, and the SL 66s enjoy a bit of a reputation for being fond of the repair shop a bit too much.
    First time I hear that.
    You have to like the ergonomics, with (just like the Rolleiflexes) controls on both sides of the camera: you need three hands: two to operate the controls, one to hold the camera.
    It is a PITA hand holding it. You would need the rather clumsy handle, which makes the whole thing even larger, to use it comfortably from free hand. It is a camera for the tripod.

    Ulrich

  2. #22
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    21
    Yes, it can be quite difficult. I find it to be easy with the 50mm, 80mm and 120mm, but the other lenses do definitely require a tripod.
    The problem is that you cannot support the lens with your hand, because it has to be on the focussing knob. I always use a neckstrap when hand holding it, otherwise it would be nearly impossible. I second that the SL66 works best on a tripod, but then it is a real joy to use.
    Regarding Q.G.´s question for problems: There are indeed some weak points:
    1. The earlier cameras do occasionally suffer from a mirror jam. The mirror is locked in the up-position then and will not return. Rollei later improved the mechanism, so a repair with the new service parts will solve this. This does however only affect very early cameras, from the 60s. Rollei also improved the magazines later and added a security lever as well as winder release button.
    2. The focussing knob is rather delicate and will not stand hard knocks.
    3. The SL66SE often develops a problem with the metering. The cables that are connected to the cell behind the mirror are made from some sort of fiberglass, they ofter break when the camera is used extensively. Repair is expensive. You can still use the camera, but it works like a classic SL66 without metering then. The SL66E however still uses metal cables and does not suffer from this problem.
    4. One should never try to focus back to infinity when the lens board is tilted. Will definitely damage the camera.

    Apart from this, I do not know any common problem. As long as they are used properly, these cameras are very reliable. As are Hasselblads. One should expect that from a camera that had cost a small fortune when new.
    My camera is from 1977, I bought it in 2006 after it had not been used for 15 years. It was rather stiff then and the shutter times were a little bit off. I sent it to Mr. Kuschnik for an overhaul and it came back perfectly smooth. He did a great job. I also replaced the old screen with the Rollei High*D-Screen, which is insanely bright compared to the old one. The only thing I do miss from time to time are some newer lenses, like the 180/4, which were never available for the Rollei. Would be the only reason for me to switch to Hasselblad. Apart from this, it´s a great camera.

  3. #23
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    21
    The weather is fine today, now I will go out and shoot some Velvia ;-)

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bilthoven, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,858
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    That's just nonsense.

    .
    When I bought the SL 66 so many years ago, it was for professional applications ( large numbers of negatives). My friend did the repairs for Hasselblad in The Netherlands, and at a certain point of time all Hasseblads were in his possession. His advice was to buy the SL66. That does not mean that the quality of Hasseblad has not improved in the mean time.
    And we never had problems with the SL66 after a huge number of exposures. Last year, I verified the quality of the shutter and mirror system. It weas still operating like new and the image quality was like with a leaf shutter.

    Jed

  5. #25
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    21
    Yes, I can confirm that the shutter system of the SL66 is - though beeing fully mechanical - very, very precise.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    524
    Images
    133
    It should be given to all newcomers the one basic advice for this camera: Never ever do anything with the back without cocking the shutter first. But I've heard something like that -including the lenses AFAIR- about Hasselblads too.

    Ulrich

  7. #27
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    21
    Exactly! "Do the swing before you do anything."

  8. #28
    gandolfi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Denmark
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    1,764
    Images
    387
    I think we can agree that both systems are great.

    But this is my main reason for keeping my SL66
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rollei-me.jpg   rollei-me3.jpg  

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Jed Freudenthal View Post
    When I bought the SL 66 so many years ago, it was for professional applications ( large numbers of negatives). My friend did the repairs for Hasselblad in The Netherlands, and at a certain point of time all Hasseblads were in his possession.
    All of them?


    Oh, you mean yours...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed Freudenthal View Post
    His advice was to buy the SL66. That does not mean that the quality of Hasseblad has not improved in the mean time.
    It has not, in fact.
    There was no need. Your statement really was/is nonsensical.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    Yes, it can be quite difficult. [...]
    Thanks for sounding a realistic note.

    Nothing is perfect.
    It should be well understood (and that's why i thought i'd mention it) though, that Rolleis too are very well made, and that problems are few and far apart. I'm not implying the opposite.

    So when we compare systems, that should be remembered.
    And when we do, yes, Ulrich, the Rollei SL 66s do have a bit of a worse reputation.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin