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Thread: Hassey vs SL66

  1. #1
    michael9793's Avatar
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    Hassey vs SL66

    I own a Hassey right now. but I noticed in my Brett Weston DVD that he is using a SL66 . it has a bellows and slight correct to it.
    If you had an opportunity to own either one. which one would you own and why. I have owned a Rollie 2006 but it is all electrical and if the rechargeable battery goes so goes your shooting.
    thanks
    Michael Andersen
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  2. #2
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    Well, I only own an Hasselblad V system, yet I have tried a friends Rollei SL 66.
    Wonderfull camera for close-ups (way superior to my Blad) yet much heavier to carry around.

    The optics are identical in every way (exception to the 50 and 40mm f/4 if I remember correctly), the coating is also very similar in both systems optics (share Zeiss optics).

    If I was searching for a system again, I would keep my present choice (Hasselblad) mainly based on weight, handling, design and superior flash capability (in case I need, not atm though), otherwise, the cameras are very similar in what they can deliver, with the macro/flash edge, being the main relevant diference, between these two superb systems.


    Have fun!

  3. #3
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    I have both.
    And I almost never touch the Hasselblad...

    I love the SL66 for so many reasons. I don't care, that it is a little heavier.

    The bellows makes the difference. "default" close-up feature. (you can even turn the lens backwards and fit it on the camera for even closer-up'er images)

    Also the bellows makes it possible to fit old interesting lenses on the camera (petzval and such..)

    great system!

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    I own Hasselblad and have only tried the SL66 a few times. I must say I love both cameras, and yes, the 66 is close to being the perfect macro camera. Overall the Hasselblad is the more reliable system however (this is not me saying it - it comes from numerous repair people) and is slightly more versatile (things like better flash sync, more available accessories, newer lenses etc.) I also find the Hasselblad easier to use - but that could be that I am used to it ;-)

  5. #5

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    I tested both systems recently. The SL66 is a wonderfully made camera, with some excellent design features - the bellows and tilt are of course the stars of the show and make it a great system for close-ups and landscapes. On the other hand, accessories are hard to come by (in the UK at least) and the wide-angle lenses are older designs compared with the later Hasselblad versions (although they still perform well, just not as well as the newer FLE 'Blad lenses). I owned my SL66 for about three months and unfortunately had to send it for repair twice in that time. So I cut my losses and switched to a Hasselblad 503CW, in the knowledge that parts and repair would be more readily available for the forseeable future.

    Sometimes I regret that choice, as the bellows do come in incredibly useful for detail shots. On the other hand, the Hasselblad 50mm FLE lens is noticeably better in the corners than the older SL66 version (which is the same as the non-FLE 'Blad 50mm). So if wide-angle photography is important to you, this might be a consideration.

    Regarding weight, there isn't really much difference if you carry a complete system. The SL66 body is larger and heavier than a 'Blad, but the lenses are a lot smaller and lighter (there's no shutter or focusing helical in them).

    Ed.

  6. #6

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    The SL66 was a camera I always dreamed of owning beginning when I was in college 30+ years ago. I never could afford one and "made do" with a Rollie 2.8C for a long time. I had the opportunity to buy a used SL66 on a couple of occasions, but finally passed on the deal because the whole system was dated by then and I could get a Hasselblad for the same amount or less. I still love the idea of the camera and the design, but repairs and parts would seem expensive at this point. There's lots of Hasselblads and parts available. Not that a Hasselblad is any cheaper to repair, but there are plenty of parts.

    Peter Gomena

  7. #7
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    i got a hasselblad, it's great and i love it! but now i am wanting to move up to LF because i want movements. how are the movements on the SL66?
    Last edited by Rinthe; 11-23-2010 at 09:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    The SL66 is still a great camera and I´m a big fan of it. The bellow is a huge advantage if you are doing macro and portraiture. With a Hasselblad, you have to use extension tubes if you want to get closer to the subject. With the SL66, you can do this effortlessly.
    The SL66 also offers an instant-return mirror, which a Hasselblad does not. However, you should have in mind that these cameras are ususally between 30 and 40 years old. I think one can compare this to an Oldtimer: It will cost a lot when in good shape and you have to have it overhauled to be happy with it. You might also want a new screen for it. Accessories will also cost a lot and are rare, as are some of the lenses, especially the 30/3,5, 40/4, 60/3,5 (ultra-rare) 120/5,6 and 500/5,6. The 150/4, 250/5,6 and 50/4 are quite common. On the other hand, you can get all of these lenses (except the 500/5,6) also in Hasselblad-mount, plus some newer designs. The SL66 also has a slow sync speed. Regarding the movements: They are rather limited with an 8° tilt. I would recommend a LF field camera like the Linhof Technika with roll film back instead.
    The built and feel of the camera however are exceptional and I never stop beeing fond of it, as my nick name shows.

    Best, Benjamin
    Last edited by Slixtiesix; 11-24-2010 at 01:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    The SL66 also offers an instant-return mirror, which a Hasselblad does not.
    Just to get this misunderstanding out of the way: more than "a" Hasselblad does. There isn't just "a" Hasselblad, and it depends on what model you go for.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    The SL66 is still a great camera and I´m a big fan of it. The bellow is a huge advantage if you are doing macro and portraiture. With a Hasselblad, you have to use extension tubes if you want to get closer to the subject. With the SL66, you can do this effortlessly.
    The SL66 also offers an instant-return mirror, which a Hasselblad does not. However, you should have in mind that these cameras are ususally between 30 and 40 years old. I think one can compare this to an Oldtimer: It will cost a lot when in good shape and you have to have it overhauled to be happy with it. You might also want a new screen for it. Accessories will also cost a lot and are rare, as are some of the lenses, especially the 30/3,5, 40/4, 60/3,5 (ultra-rare) 120/5,6 and 500/5,6. The 150/4, 250/5,6 and 50/4 are quite common. On the other hand, you can get all of these lenses (except the 500/5,6) also in Hasselblad-mount, plus some newer designs. The SL66 also has a slow sync speed. Regarding the movements: They are rather limited with an 8° tilt. I would recommend a LF field camera like the Linhof Technika with roll film back instead.
    The built and feel of the camera however are exceptional and I never stop beeing fond of it, as my nick name shows.

    Best, Benjamin
    I fully agree. I now have an SL 66 for about 35 years and I have chosen it at that time for its dependability. The Hassies were usually in the repairshop. May be the Hassis of that age or not around anymore.

    Jed

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