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  1. #1
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Rolleiflex 3.5F uneven frame spacing- can I fix myself?

    Hi All,

    I have had my über-ugly Rolleiflex for over ten years now (not first owner, obviously), and after a too long period of non-use, frame spacing has become erratic. I loose maybe one or two frames per 120 film, so it's not horrible, but still I'd want to get it fixed.

    The obvious solution seems to go for CLA at some reputed address (would be Wil van Maanen in this country). However, if possible I want to avoid the cost. Many of you will feel that a 3.5F only deserves the best of treatment, which is obviously not be me. I agree with that, but then again, considering the state of the camera (extremely worn cosmetically, some haze in lens, focusing screen badly scratched, focusing panel not perfectly flush with the normal, etc.), I feel that, if possible at all, I should give repair by not-entirely-clumsy-me a try.

    Can any of you Rollei-experts tell me how to adjust the (evenness of) frame spacing?

    Please don't flame me for following this route- I'm just a guy with more expenses than he would like.

    Thanks, Sander.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rolleiflex_35f_1.jpg   rolleiflex_35f_2.jpg  

  2. #2
    jmcd's Avatar
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    I think you need a transport overhaul, which involves breaking down the transport mechanism into individual pieces, cleaning, replacing worn parts with suitable replacements, and assembly with proper lubrication.

    When I had this done last year, my tech sent me photos of my failing transport gears laden with grease, then broken down into individual pieces before he put the system back together. At least one important spring was fatigued, which he replaced. He said that no grease should be visible with a properly lubricated Rollei.

  3. #3
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    The wheel measures the correct distance, so if it is faulty, all the frames would be overlapping or too widely spaced. Are the widely spaced frames at the beginning or the end of the roll. Do they get wider as it goes or is it random?
    Is there enough tension on the wheel that it is not slipping? Is the wheel hard to turn? Is the film starting correctly? That is, does it sense the tape bulge correctly?

  4. #4

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    Transport mechanism are tough to CLA. Lots of springs involved that tend to fly away when you open them up. Shutters are actually fair easier to CLA IMO.

  5. #5
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Look up Hans Kerensky on flickr, http://www.flickr.com/photos/2950454...7624987139266/ and see what he did to repair a Rolleiflex (admittedly a slightly less complex model T). Seeing the 79 part story is indeed a good lesson. I sent my Automat to Jurgen Kuschnik instead.

    Maybe Claus Prochnows Rollei Technical report is something to start out with.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #6

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    I take no responsibility for what happens to your camera, but here's a repair manual:
    http://www.kyphoto.com/classics/repairmanuals.html

  7. #7
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    Look up Hans Kerensky on flickr, http://www.flickr.com/photos/2950454...7624987139266/ and see what he did to repair a Rolleiflex (admittedly a slightly less complex model T).
    Thanks Jerevan. This photo guide gets me a bit closer. The pictures are brilliant (and digital).

  8. #8
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    The wheel measures the correct distance, so if it is faulty, all the frames would be overlapping or too widely spaced. Are the widely spaced frames at the beginning or the end of the roll. Do they get wider as it goes or is it random?
    Is there enough tension on the wheel that it is not slipping? Is the wheel hard to turn? Is the film starting correctly? That is, does it sense the tape bulge correctly?
    Thanks for the suggestions ic-racer.

    It's random. There is enough tension on the distance measuring wheel (or what you call it), such that it's not slipping; I adjusted that some time earlier when it was actually slipping. The camera senses the start of the film just fine.

    I think I'll just open her up again and see what happens when transporting a dummy-roll. Nothing lost from just looking.

  9. #9
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Daniel View Post
    I take no responsibility for what happens to your camera, but here's a repair manual:
    http://www.kyphoto.com/classics/repairmanuals.html
    Thanks Dan. I already had this manual saved om my computer- have used it previously for other 'repairs'. Film advance is mentioned but I can't find what I think I need. Time for a long hard look again, maybe.

    The diagrams are useful in any case.



 

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