Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,549   Posts: 1,544,636   Online: 689
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Berlin Wi.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    247

    What will be the future for cameras?

    As the digital revolution continues, I'm wondering if the 35mm camera will still be in production in a few years. I'm thinking that the 645's will be taking the place of the high end 35mm cameras. Perhaps a film cartridge like the 35mm cartridges of today made for a medium size film, and new backs that will take that size film will be offered. Then your 645 would take either a film back or a digital back. Even if a new film cartridge was not introduced, the 645 might be the camera of choice in the future. Mass production of these dual format cameras would reduce the price and become competative with the standard digital format camera (based on a 35mm SLR of today) and would have more options. Either way, I look for medium format cameras in some sort to be with us for years to come, but I think the 35mm SLR is going to be a dieing format. That is unless some problems develop in the digital world that would cause people to want 35mm cameras. What do you think?

  2. #2
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,839
    Images
    108
    Dont worry , There will always be a investor who wants to kick the death horse. I am worrying about the low prices of Leitz Rangefinders , they go to amateur hands who dont know what he is holding.
    I saw some professional photographers treat the Leica like a toyota. All coating gone , bumps everywhere.
    But I like digital cameras which BBC uses. Antiques Roadshow have a fascinating quality and these cameras are cheaper than M9. I am hoping to use that cameras at the future for example Sony Z1 with Zeiss optics.
    Video cameras are faraway better than photography cameras and I dont I will not see a future at a frozen image.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Jersey Channel Islands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    430
    Blog Entries
    2
    They say that 35mm is the biggest selling format, so I think that 35mm cameras will be around for a long while yet, although possibly not new cameras, there are still a few in production from the smaller producers, and a huge second hand market, but I don't see much change in the 120 film and equipment market, again,I think we will rely more on the used market than new, are there any new 645 cameras still made now that both bronica and pentax have stopped production, do Mamiya still produce any film cameras? Richard

  4. #4
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,648
    Quote Originally Posted by Ric Trexell View Post
    ...Perhaps a film cartridge like the 35mm cartridges of today made for a medium size film, and new backs that will take that size film will be offered.... Then your 645 would take either a film back or a digital back. I think the 35mm SLR is going to be a dieing format. That is unless some problems develop in the digital world that would cause people to want 35mm cameras. What do you think?
    I thought I was looking at a post from 10 or 15 years ago.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #5
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,648
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    I am worrying about the low prices of Leitz Rangefinders , they go to amateur hands who dont know what he is holding.
    "Low prices"???
    The higher their price the more they will only be in the hands of people who buy them because they are expensive.

    Video cameras are faraway better than photography cameras and I dont I will not see a future at a frozen image.
    I don't agree with that, unless you mean in journalism, where videos are being used more and more, because that's what people want. Sometimes a video is more powerful than a still image.
    Though I think really good still photos will always have their place.
    The famous image of the US flag being raised on Iwo Jima has a power much greater than that of the movie taken by the film camera operator standing right next to Joe Rosenthal.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #6
    brian d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    Images
    1
    lxdude;
    The famous image of the US flag being raised on Iwo Jima has a power much greater than that of the movie taken by the film camera operator standing right next to Joe Rosenthal.
    Could'nt agree more, in the movie clip the flag goes up and that's that, kind of ho-hum as far as battle field film clips go, in Rosenthal's photo you catch all the intensity and determination -and fear/stress-of the moment.
    IMHO there are some places where a moving picture will never replace a photograph.
    Real men use Speed Graphics and flashbulbs.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by R gould View Post
    They say that 35mm is the biggest selling format, so I think that 35mm cameras will be around for a long while yet, although possibly not new cameras, there are still a few in production from the smaller producers, and a huge second hand market, but I don't see much change in the 120 film and equipment market, again,I think we will rely more on the used market than new, are there any new 645 cameras still made now that both bronica and pentax have stopped production, do Mamiya still produce any film cameras? Richard
    I feel pretty confident that the last cameras produced will be for sheet sizes. They are simpler to build and the level of capitalization is much, much lower than for roll/cartridge formats.

    Plus, if the worst should come to pass and film no longer be produced, there are always paper negatives, glass plates for the intrepid, etc. - assuming photosensitized materials remain available (i.e. that your country's central bank has not appropriated all silver by then ;-)). These will work just fine with large format cameras.

    I do not see any real issue regarding camera availability in the short-term. Of greater concern is getting them serviced. I live in a metropolitan area of 3 million peope and there are, perhaps, 4 places that will perform a CLA on a 35mm camera.

    And I would only trust 2.5 of them.

    I'm not sure there is even one that I would trust to work on, say, a leaf-shutter on a Bronica SQ S or PS lens.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Dont worry , There will always be a investor who wants to kick the death horse. I am worrying about the low prices of Leitz Rangefinders , they go to amateur hands who dont know what he is holding.
    I saw some professional photographers treat the Leica like a toyota. All coating gone , bumps everywhere.
    But I like digital cameras which BBC uses. Antiques Roadshow have a fascinating quality and these cameras are cheaper than M9. I am hoping to use that cameras at the future for example Sony Z1 with Zeiss optics.
    Video cameras are faraway better than photography cameras and I dont I will not see a future at a frozen image.
    I agree that the future of still-photo journalism will be in frame capture from video cameras.

    Still-photo journalism puts most of the editorial control in the hands of the photographer. These days the raw footage is purchased by syndicated feeds that distribute it to customers.

    High quality video feed wherein individual frames can be harvested to support the editorial viewpoint of any number of customers would be of great benefit to the syndicates. It would remove most of the editorial control from the individual (or device) performing the capture and place it in the hands of the customer paying for the feed.

    A shift to this format is already taking place and is gathering speed. It would not surprise me greatly if digital still image cameras disappear altogether in the next 10 years. Executives from Sony & Olympus have already said that this is where they believe the future is and that the dSLR is nothing more than waypost along that road.

    Perhaps the still-image film camera may yet outlive its digital counterpart!
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    965
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by R gould View Post
    They say that 35mm is the biggest selling format
    Sure--how many millions of 35mm cameras have been produced over the years? Many are still in use. Also, the one-use disposable camera--the direct descendant of George Eastman's original--remains a popular item at drugstores. Consider this factoid from Kodak's web site:

    "The number of Kodak one-time-use cameras recycled is now approaching 1 billion. When considering competitors cameras that are also collected through our program, the total number of OTUCs recycled exceeds 1.5 billion cameras."

    That's presumably cumulative since about 1990 or so, when they started the recycling program.

  10. #10
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Last camera made or last film made? It's a tough call... Honestly I don't need any new cameras, there are so many old ones around. People are still using cameras that are 50 or 100 years old so there is no reason to believe that all the cameras will suddenly stop working any time soon. Whether there will be film to run through them is a more pressing concern in my opinion. Working cameras could well outlast film production. I hope not but they could.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin