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  1. #11
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Whenever I carry 120 roll films, I'm afraid I may pressure damage them. That is, if they bang around too much and something solid and sharp hits their surface, such can potentially dent the film leading to damage.


    You're really over-thinking this.

  2. #12

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    Try Soap Holders from the Dollar Store

    They are inexpensive, they hold 4 rolls and come in different colours, work great.

    Link for a picture: http://www.rei.com/product/695993

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post


    You're really over-thinking this.
    +1 I just carry them in cardboard box the packs of five rolls come in, I've been shooting 120 roll film for nearly thirty years, and never had one damaged.
    Ben

  4. #14

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    My camera bag has two outside pockets. One I use for unexposed 120 film, the other for exposed 120 film. Before shooting I peel the film out of both the box and the wrappers. Never had a problem with damage.

  5. #15

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    Otter made a small waterproof hard case whose interior width is about a mm or so larger than a 120/220 roll, and whose length permits 6 rolls. It's very light and packs anywhere and will protect your film from trauma, rain/humidity, and from immersion in a stream. I haven't seen the otter brand around in sometime now but there are black waterproof cases at K&S Photography in Palo Alto, California (where I bought the Otter years back) that are larger but offer the same protection as the Otter. I have two of those for storing multiple rolls in the refrigerator and in the cooler while traveling. The smaller Otter is ideal for backpacking - I only wish that I would have bought two.

    Thomas

  6. #16

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    A properly sized pill bottle also works. There is one size that
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  7. #17

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    I'm with JimO and the other's about this molehill. In my case, 45 years of having never even thought about it. Keep 'em in the cardboard box they came in. If not, so what.

    I've screwed up a lot of film over the years, but never from carrying 120 in a bag. I carry a lot of 120 film loose in a tank bag on a motorcycle and that gets beat worse than whatever you do.

  8. #18

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    Acratech made metal canisters with screw-on tops (one canister held one roll). If you're concerned about damage, these would be the ultimate solution. They aren't shown at Acratech's website anymore, but you may be able to find them secondhand. They cost $13.50 each when I bought mine in 2002.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I leave unexposed film in the foil and, where appropriate, the cardboard pro-pack boxes.

    Exposed film goes into the plastic roll holders that J & C sold while it was operating, and Glazer's sells now (for a lot more than J & C).

    I like being to grab the exposed film easily and quickly. For colour, I also like the fact that I can pop that film into my pocket and take it to the lab without worrying.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20

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    I put my film into a heavy duty zip lock bag that comes holds hydrasleeves, a product I use at work for groundwater sampling. It probably gives minimum protection from anything other than water and as these bags go into the outside pocket of my bag or the fridge or into a larger bag in the freezer it is the protection I need the most. The main reason I use them is for the ease of moving them from one place to another. I used to carry the four canister I got with Adox film but the bags work out better however I should carry at least one of the canisters with me in case I end up with a roll that does need extra protection from light.

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