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  1. #21
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Since I don't really know what I'm looking at I am looking for local deals so I can handle stuff first. It seems like Hasselblad 500C, Mamiya RB67, Mamiya C330 are the main kits around along with the battery powered stuff. The C330 kits look quite affordable with a few lenses. The RB67 is more with several lenses but with one it is less than the Hasselblad. I'm surprised there are some standard Hasselblad 80mm kits which are affordable though it would just be a one lens kit for now, the 50mm kits seem much more expensive.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  2. #22
    photoncatcher's Avatar
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    One more voice for the RBs. Been shooting with them for years, and never had a problem in the cold weather (except my fingers getting numb). The Kievs are great too, but I prefer the 6x7 format to the 6x6.

  3. #23

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    I don't think anyone mentioned and it should be at least brought up, the RZ67 has an emergency mechanical function, (but it will only shoot at 1/400).

    If it were me I would go with a Hassy or an RB.

  4. #24
    hpulley's Avatar
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    While I'd love to be able to shoot at 1/400 or 1/500 in emergency situations I'm usually shooting at slower shutter speeds in the kind of weather that kills the battery.

    Seems I could get an RB67 with 65/90/180 or 50/90/150 for a fairly reasonable amount locally, both with a pair of 120 backs. Or I could get a Hasselblad with just the 80mm 2.8 but for less money. Would like a wide angle too but 50mm Hasselblad kits are about twice as much and way more than the three lens RB67 kits. Must check them out.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  5. #25
    olleorama's Avatar
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    try to test a mamiya super 23 with a ground glass back. Sweet setup for landscapes with the 100/3.5. 6x9 is also alot more negative real estate.

  6. #26
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    try to test a mamiya super 23 with a ground glass back. Sweet setup for landscapes with the 100/3.5. 6x9 is also alot more negative real estate.
    Thanks but they seem rare within a couple of hours drive of here.

    At this point it looks like a no brainer, a 3 lens 2-back Mamiya RB67 kit though the Hasselblad is the classic and I have a line currently on a 6x6 enlarger with 80mm SC lens. If I go for 6x7 I'd be cropping or looking for another enlarger. The 6x7 enlarger I can find is a Vivitar with 75mm Nikkor lens which sounds worse? Can't see any 6x9 enlargers around.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  7. #27
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    The RB67 is such a flexible camera system. Different back for different formats, different VF's, outstanding glass, Plenty of parts and pieces available. Also it has the ability to focus very close to the subject.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  8. #28
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Thanks but they seem rare within a couple of hours drive of here.

    At this point it looks like a no brainer, a 3 lens 2-back Mamiya RB67 kit though the Hasselblad is the classic and I have a line currently on a 6x6 enlarger with 80mm SC lens. If I go for 6x7 I'd be cropping or looking for another enlarger. The 6x7 enlarger I can find is a Vivitar with 75mm Nikkor lens which sounds worse? Can't see any 6x9 enlargers around.
    I have had both the Hasselblad (a 500CM) the RB and currently the super 23. I feel like I have gained a lot with every system change. The 6x7 format is a lot better than 6x6 IMO, and of course YMMV, there are as many squareists as there are croppers. I had constant problems with my backs with the hasselblad, probably because they were old and former owners had skipped maintenance. I have no complaints on the RB system, I really liked it. I sold it to finance my ventures into LF, which proved not to be my thang (mainly due to developing and film costs), I needed something like a rangefinder at times, for fast shooting, and something like a view camera for more contemplative shooting. Enter the 23... Which also, like the RB has amazing close up possibilities. What's with mamiya and the bellows fixation anyways? The rb, rz, c-series, super 23...

    I don't really miss the RB, but if I had to chose between the 500 series hasselblad and the RB I'd go RB everytime. I would easily go with the vivitar enlarger. If you don't you'll always wonder how it would be to print 6x7-

    A small ps, I've shot quite a few rolls with the hasselblad in temps down to -42 centigrade with wind, I didn't have a problems with slow speeds. Except for a back that broke, but that would probably had happen anyways.

  9. #29
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Even a Holga can beat your Nikon? I find that surprising. By reputation their optics are poor but perhaps I've heard wrong. The price seems to be right. Which Holga do you have?
    The bare bones plastic lens 120N.

    It doesn't happen all the time but the center of the Holga's view is quite sharp.

    Caveat, I'm not an F-64 type guy the soft edges and built in vignetting don't bother me a bit.

    This effect can make for less work at the enlarger in many shots.

    This camera makes snaps look really cool.

    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    but I've never, ever worked with larger negatives so I may not know what I'm missing.
    It's not just the negative, composing is such a pleasure on an RB's ground glass.

    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Thus I want to try 120 but I don't want to invest a lot because I don't want something that is an order of magnitude harder.
    If there is no rush, MF isn't really that hard, by this I mean only that it takes some practice and planning and certain subjects may be tougher.

    At a drag race, a 35mm camera with a motor drive is a great choice.

    Doing a portrait of a willing subject in the pits or a landscape shot tough changes the equation, 10 shots of a single subject is about right. With 35mm I find it tough to fill a roll with a single subject, that means I waste some film or have film "stuck in the camera" waiting for another subject.

    The other thing to keep in mind along this line is that because of the differences in the look, the constraints, and the logistics of MF; you will think differently when you use it.

    What I'm saying is that once you get a feel for an RB or a Holga you will find you reach for them for the personality they bring to certain shooting situations.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #30

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    You will still need a lgiht meter.

    No one seems to mention that when you go to a mechanical shutter you probably won't have a built in light meter. I use a RB67 Pro S with the waist level finder, but have a handheld flash/light meter. That ofcourse uses batteries, but you can have it hang inside your jacket until you want to use it. If you are outside on a sunny day you could probably get by with the sunny 16 rule. I have used Minolta X-700's for the last 25 years and started to lose interest in battery powered cameras when twice I walked a good distance only to find out my battery was dead. Of my two X-700's, one jammed up the other day but since I bought it new 25 years ago, I'm not going to get it repaired. I will probably get a manual Nikon 35mm when the other X-700 goes, or just use the Pro S. I feel I have lost the feel of photography since going to those auto X-700's and want to get back to deciding my own settings and not just relying on a computer to make the call. If you get a camera like the RB67 series, (I would suggest the Pro S) you can get a viewfinder with a light meter but you will be paying more for it and might better put that money into a handheld meter. (This is my most humble opinion.)

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