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  1. #21
    declark's Avatar
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    Having the common set of 50, 80, & 150, it's the 150 CF I seem to enjoy the most. The 80C runs second place. The 50 FLE is used the least. The 50 doesn't seem wide enough for me when I want the exaggerated wide look.

  2. #22

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    The 50 mm on 6x6 has the same horizontal angle of view as a 32 mm lens would on 35 mm format.
    To get the same vertical angle of view though, you need to put a 21 mm lens on your 35 mm format camera (but that will then of course have a wider horizontal angle of view.)

    So based on the assumption that we tend to try to fit things in our photos along the long side of the format, you get extra on the short side when using 6x6, compared to 35 mm format.
    That's what makes 6x6 lenses appear wider to rectangular format shooters than they are.

  3. #23
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rc51owner View Post
    If the 50 is close to a 28mm in 35mm format then the 60 would be close to a 33mm. No? I can appreciate that the aspect ratio would impact the feel of the focal length since isn't the focal length normally defined based upon the diagonal

    Now that is a great suggestion. The LCS (local camera store) that I bought the 501c body from has a rental department. I need to do is now get a back and some film and then I can go to town. Oh I also need to learn how to load film/use the camera/meter without a meter... quite a lot of things in fact

    Regards,

    M
    If you think that there is a reasonable possibility that you might buy the lens from your LCS, I'd suggest asking them if they would be willing to agree to crediting all or part of any rental fees you pay toward any lens or accessory purchase you might make from them within, say, 60 days of the rental. You may find that they would be quite agreeable to such a proposal.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24

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    The 160mm CB lens is a Tessar design, which may be worth investigating. I use Tessars in LF at various focal lengths because of their character, but haven't tried the CB.

    I'd also suggest trying the 50mm FLE, which is a focal length possibly more suited to environmental portraits. Especially good close up, with a photojournalistic approach.

    I've not found the focal length equivalents really match up very well between 35mm and 6x6 -- the formats are too different and they really have their own character.

  5. #25

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    I've been trying to think up a snappy reply to the OP's original question about Hasselblad lenses and "character." My smarty-pants reply is that they all exhibit the "Hasselblad character." Sharp with nice, smooth contrast, more akin to the character of a view camera lens. I just consider them to be "high-fidelity." The only difference between my 80 and 50 CFT* lenses is focal length and corner sharpness. My 120 I would describe as a tiny bit gritter in its character in some circumstances. That's why the 150 is usually the lens of choice for portraiture. Its reputation is for a smoother, rounder rendition of subjects than the 120. I've also used the 180 and 250mm lenses, and other than to say they're excellent, I can't comment on any particular difference in "character" from any of the other lenses. I haven't used the C lenses in years, but they were excellent as well.

    As for which lenses to choose to build a system, that's a personal matter. I bought my kit as a whole, used. My favorite lens of the three is the 120. The focal length is more often "right" for the scene in front of me. The 50 is perfect when I need "wide." The 80 is fine for when it fits the need. I use the 120 and 80 much more often than the 50. A good setup is the 50-100-150mm lenses, another is 60-120-180, which leaves room for the 40 if you need a very wide lens and the 250 if you want a longer one. Truth be told, I could find use for all of them if I could 1. afford them, 2. carry them around easily.

    I would buy the CFT* lenses or the CFi lenses because Hasselblad no longer makes parts for the C series.

    Did I mention that I like the system?

    Peter Gomena

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