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  1. #41
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    But I am thinking I will be able to take more engaging, more powerful pictures with a tlr.
    I highly doubt it. Perhaps even less so than with a camera with which you see exactly what the film sees, and which operates more quickly.

    They are great cameras to use for a good deal of things. I love mine, and shoot them often. But I do not think that using one will drastically change your pictures for the better...though it could change them for the worse in quite a few situations.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #42
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    I've been offered a camera from a person that I work with...and he's thinking it's an old bellows Kodak camera. He has no clue if it even works - but if it's free, I'll take it. My co-worker was pleasantly surprised that I'm shooting my mom's old Brownie Holiday, even though it's a point and shoot. Then again, I'm seen coming in and out of the building wearing a multitude of camera bags with one camera or the other with me.

    I'm also looking at a Pentax medium format but would like one that's totally manual. Any suggestions?

  3. #43
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinhole_dreamer View Post
    I'm also looking at a Pentax medium format but would like one that's totally manual. Any suggestions?
    Do you mean fully manual or fully mechanical? TMK, all of them allow fully manual shooting. (Why would they not, being higher-end cameras?)
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Do you mean fully manual or fully mechanical? TMK, all of them allow fully manual shooting. (Why would they not, being higher-end cameras?)
    Totally manual like my old K1000. I don't need geegaws and buttons and motors and the like. The only thing my K1000 needs is a battery for the light meter but everything else is manual.

  5. #45
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    My old Yashicaflex is so quiet sometimes I'm not sure I've taken a picture so it is indeed great for churches and quiet street shooting. My Canon FTbN is like a door closing by comparison while my Mamiya RB67 with its mirror 4 times the area is like a door slamming shut, not exactly quiet.

    I find focusing more difficult at waist level however. I prefer to use a prism in my Mamiya RB67 which is faster. I can of course use the sport finder in the Yashicaflex with pre/hyperfocusing but it is not ideal.

    Neither my Yashicaflex or Mamiya RB67 are fast for use as both wind and cock the shutter separately though I could get a motorized back for the RB67. My AF EOS bodies are much faster obviously but not quiet with motor drives though without a moving mirror the 1N RS is not too bad in single shot mode.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  6. #46

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    Harry, it isn't hard to put a prism on a Yashica. I've put both a Hasselblad NC-2 and a Hasselblad chimney finder on a Yashica (and a Minolta Autocord). Here's a sample-

    [IMG] P1040094 franken-mat 1 by ddandan, on Flickr[/IMG]

  7. #47
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Wow, that's interesting!

    I must say though, it defeats part of the purpose of the camera however, which is its unobtrusiveness. I was taking pictures of my son tonight with the Yashicaflex and the EOS 650. Delta 3200 in both, no flash, trying to be discrete but whenever I brought the 650 with 135mm f/2 up to my eye he would realize a picture was being taken and would give me a fake posed smile, not what I was looking for. The Mamiya is even bigger of course! With the Yashicaflex waist level finder and quiet shutter he didn't really notice so I could get more natural poses. It is a trade off, ease of seeing perfect focus vs. stealth.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  8. #48

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    I love my Mamiya C220, which I bought new in the 1970s. It is much lighter and smaller than the C330. I think the Mamiya lenses are excellent and interchangeability is a real plus that completely expands your horizons. It is equivalent to using a SLR. I use the 135 mm and 55 mm most often. I have been at camera shows where a C220 body with a lens were going for around $100. The only issue is that you have to manually cock the shutter. But you know what? I do it without thinking. It doesn't slow things down and the saving in weight is important.

    I also have a Yashica Mat 124 G. It is a great camera. I always thought that the Yashica lenses were first rate at a low end price. The fact that there is a Cds meter coupled to the speeds and lens opening is really unusual on a twin lens reflex. It is very easy to use and I would recommend it if you can get it at a good price. Mine is a bit worn but I only paid $30 for it an antiques store. However, on ebay some sellers are actually listing it at around $500 to $700. That is absurd. It is a good camera but it does not have that amount of quality to warrant that high of a price.

    I also picked up a near mint Kalloflex (Kowa) from a dealer for $17 who did not think it was working. Someone replaced a little knob with a big screw that blocked the advance crank. When I got home I took off the screw and the camera began working. What a great camera. The images are tack sharp and the camera is built like a tank. In the 1950s, it was Japan's answer to the Rollieflex. I would really recommend it. It is very ergonomic. The advance crank is concentric with the focusing knob. The shutter release is on the opposite (left side). It is the easiest of all my twins lens reflexes to use. They are fairly uncommon is the U.S. but might be more common in Japan.

    I also have a Zeiss Ikoflex IIa with a Tessar lens. To be honest. While, collecting German equipment is my area of interest, I like the Japanese twin lens reflexes better. The Ikoflex just seems awkward in my hands.

    My point, is to shop around. You might be very pleasantly surprised by the great twin lens reflex you can get for a low price.

  9. #49

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    I have a Rolleiflex 3.5T (it's a K8T2 - made between 1961 and 1966). the meter works perfectly and it's in fantastic condition. I am extremely pleased with the photos I get from it. Here's one example:


    Faversham Quayside by rushfan2112 (Late Developer), on Flickr

    As it's not one of the top of the range models, they tend to be reasonably priced. I had mine CLA'd last year and it runs as smooth a silk. You should do fine with Yashicas and Mamiyas (I've owned both down the years) but I love my Rollei.....
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

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