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  1. #21

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    thanks steve .. !

    that is the most detailed manual i think i have ever read

    john

  2. #22

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    Susan,

    You might want to try a flash. I doubt that camera has sync, and even if it does it'll be for flashbulbs, not electronic flash. Paper is pretty slow, I want to say Ilford RC is ISO 25. You could take advantage of that, stop the camera all the way down (if there's an indoor/outdoor switch, put it to outdoor), lock the shutter open with the T or B setting, and fire the flash by hand.

    I read a thread here that suggests you might be able to increase the speed by preflashing.

    I'm not sure what the value of that bellows camera was, but $200 is a bit of change. If you're serious about getting it, make sure the bellows are light, the lens isn't full of fungus and gunk, the shutter still works, and you can get film for it (if you plan on shooting it!). If not, $200 will get you a decent camera of some kind. Check out the Zeiss Super Ikontas, if you are into vintage cameras you will love them. I have a plain Ikonta with a cheap lens, it is great fun, the results are decent, and they're the best-built folder I've seen by a long shot.

    I definitely feel your pain on the addiction. I started with a K1000 and it's been downhill since there, I'm starting to put together a 4x5 kit now...

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian d View Post
    And then you start getting carried away

    You are in the right place!
    Here is a few more directions your hobby (obsession for some of us) can lead

    I *really* am kicking myself for not getting that old '30s bellows Kodak - the smaller one that I saw. *sigh*

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi susan

    i have a brownie that take 116 film as well.
    you can easily tape some paper in the camera instead of film
    or if you can find a 2nd spool, you can roll paper onto the spools instead.
    i am currently doing that with a 3a, and it is easy .. just use masking tape

    rate your paper at around 6 or 12 ..
    my brownie has 3 "fstops" .. i haven't figured out what they are ( maybe 8. 11, 16? ) but expose your paper at around 1 second wide open for starters to get an idea

    have fun!
    john
    Hiya John! I've been thinking about that whole issue of using the paper in lieu of film. I asked my husband to take one of our dowel rods (from a Titanic project of one of my son's for school art class) and cut it down to size then just drill holes in the ends so I can use it instead of an extra spool! My husband doubts that the idea will work but I also suffer from extreme clumsiness so I'm not allowed near the power tools or anything sharp.

    My question is (because I KNOW it can be done) is how to keep the paper from curling too badly. I have two small Rubbermaid trays that will fit up to a 5x7.

    As for my camera, I found a manual for the Model 2 and Model 2A online. Mine has two metal slides on the top of it which control how much light is let into the camera. I've read it a couple of times...and need to redownload it as we have had some computer issues and lost some information...like the manual. *sigh* I think this was made around 1904-ish, from what I can find online. She's lovely though.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMD View Post
    Susan,

    You might want to try a flash. I doubt that camera has sync, and even if it does it'll be for flashbulbs, not electronic flash. Paper is pretty slow, I want to say Ilford RC is ISO 25. You could take advantage of that, stop the camera all the way down (if there's an indoor/outdoor switch, put it to outdoor), lock the shutter open with the T or B setting, and fire the flash by hand.

    I read a thread here that suggests you might be able to increase the speed by preflashing.

    I'm not sure what the value of that bellows camera was, but $200 is a bit of change. If you're serious about getting it, make sure the bellows are light, the lens isn't full of fungus and gunk, the shutter still works, and you can get film for it (if you plan on shooting it!). If not, $200 will get you a decent camera of some kind. Check out the Zeiss Super Ikontas, if you are into vintage cameras you will love them. I have a plain Ikonta with a cheap lens, it is great fun, the results are decent, and they're the best-built folder I've seen by a long shot.

    I definitely feel your pain on the addiction. I started with a K1000 and it's been downhill since there, I'm starting to put together a 4x5 kit now...
    I started with a Minolta X370 - and immediately switched over to my husband's K1000. Then I bought a Lensbaby Muse for it. Now I want to get the macro attachments for THAT because I love my Lensbaby. The best 'big money' I've ever spent on a camera or equipment.

    That $200 was STEEP and I *wanted* that camera. The smaller one was $30 - but I didn't get it. *sigh* I didn't look at it too closely to see what all worked. I should have bought it anyway.

    I found an Ikonta online - $135...but the site says that it's "not for use" as it's too valuble - and should only be displayed on a shelf, but the camera works. Shutter fires, the lens is in good shape, ect...I just hate to buy something like that and then find out, "Whoa. There's something not right!" Which is why I like hitting the resale shops because at least that way, I can do a hands on inspection of it.

    And it goes on and on and on. The next thing I want to do is make a pinhole camera out a wooden coffin I have.

  6. #26
    brian d's Avatar
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    I *really* am kicking myself for not getting that old '30s bellows Kodak - the smaller one that I saw. *sigh
    Don't feel too bad about it, while most old Kodak's use oddball film sizes, while a lot of the other brand camera's use 120 film which for now at least is still readily available
    the site says that it's "not for use" as it's too valuble
    That's a matter of personal opinion, camera's are made to take pictures not sit on a shelf.(although some of us do keep them proudly displayed on shelves )Unless its so fragile that its at risk of falling apart there is no reason not to use it with proper care and upkeep. That line makes it sound to me like said camera has some sort of problems.
    Other folks may disagree but that's the way I see it. I'll keep using my old camera's as long as I can get film for them.
    Real men use Speed Graphics and flashbulbs.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian d View Post
    Don't feel too bad about it, while most old Kodak's use oddball film sizes, while a lot of the other brand camera's use 120 film which for now at least is still readily available

    That's a matter of personal opinion, camera's are made to take pictures not sit on a shelf.(although some of us do keep them proudly displayed on shelves )Unless its so fragile that its at risk of falling apart there is no reason not to use it with proper care and upkeep. That line makes it sound to me like said camera has some sort of problems.
    Other folks may disagree but that's the way I see it. I'll keep using my old camera's as long as I can get film for them.
    That's what I was thinking...that *something* was wrong somewhere. I don't mind odd sized film as that is what paper is for! I keep my cameras displayed on our china hutch, next to some silver odds and ends that I've picked up at the local shops. (Even if it's silver plated and $2 I'll end up buying it! That sort of goes along with the bjd addiction I have as the dolls end up 'using' them in the photo stories I write.)

    I'm with you ... as long as I can get film for the majority of them and paper for the odds and ends sizes, I'm going to happily keep shooting.

  8. #28

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    Also a very cheap way to get a good medium format camera is to buy an Agfa Isolette with an agnar lens. They can still be had for under $10 and I've gotten some amazingly sharp photos with one.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinhole_dreamer View Post
    I *really* am kicking myself for not getting that old '30s bellows Kodak - the smaller one that I saw. *sigh*
    Folding Kodaks are a pretty variable lot and US$30 may well have been too much. A lot of them have really primitive lenses and shutters---Kodak were largely in the business of selling "everyman" cameras, which by modern standards have, um, limited capabilities. And as someone else pointed out, many of them use extinct film.

    IMHO, similar amounts of money are better spent on something like a Nettar, a more modern camera with bulletproof architecture. There are periodic threads here on affordable folders, and there are a lot of us around who are a little bit mad for them. Personally, I've had very good luck bottom-feeding on eBay for dirt-cheap cameras; I've gotten a pretty even split between the three categories "wow!", "OK", and "paperweight", and at US$10-20 per camera that's quite decent.

    ($135 for a working Ikonta might or might not be a reasonable price, depending on the condition and the lens and so on. There are a lot of them out there, though, so don't feel like any particular example is "now or never".)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #30
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fdfjc View Post
    Also a very cheap way to get a good medium format camera is to buy an Agfa Isolette with an agnar lens. They can still be had for under $10 and I've gotten some amazingly sharp photos with one.
    I've been looking and found a 5x6 (6x5?) Pentax online for about $350 with a 70mm lens. That's not much more than what I paid for my Minolta years ago with lens.

    Decisions decisions...

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