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  1. #31
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Folding Kodaks are a pretty variable lot and US$30 may well have been too much. A lot of them have really primitive lenses and shutters---Kodak were largely in the business of selling "everyman" cameras, which by modern standards have, um, limited capabilities. And as someone else pointed out, many of them use extinct film.

    IMHO, similar amounts of money are better spent on something like a Nettar, a more modern camera with bulletproof architecture. There are periodic threads here on affordable folders, and there are a lot of us around who are a little bit mad for them. Personally, I've had very good luck bottom-feeding on eBay for dirt-cheap cameras; I've gotten a pretty even split between the three categories "wow!", "OK", and "paperweight", and at US$10-20 per camera that's quite decent.

    ($135 for a working Ikonta might or might not be a reasonable price, depending on the condition and the lens and so on. There are a lot of them out there, though, so don't feel like any particular example is "now or never".)

    -NT

    Extinct film doesn't bother me. *shrugs*

    I'm still searching. I'll be searching probably a month or two from now anyway. I don't have any extra cash around to get a camera/lens combo.

  2. #32

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    coffin?
    pinhole?
    large format paper?
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinhole_dreamer View Post
    Hiya John! I've been thinking about that whole issue of using the paper in lieu of film. I asked my husband to take one of our dowel rods (from a Titanic project of one of my son's for school art class) and cut it down to size then just drill holes in the ends so I can use it instead of an extra spool! My husband doubts that the idea will work but I also suffer from extreme clumsiness so I'm not allowed near the power tools or anything sharp.

    My question is (because I KNOW it can be done) is how to keep the paper from curling too badly. I have two small Rubbermaid trays that will fit up to a 5x7.

    As for my camera, I found a manual for the Model 2 and Model 2A online. Mine has two metal slides on the top of it which control how much light is let into the camera. I've read it a couple of times...and need to redownload it as we have had some computer issues and lost some information...like the manual. *sigh* I think this was made around 1904-ish, from what I can find online. She's lovely though.

    hi susan

    i process my paper negatives these days in a coffee based developer
    ( spiked with a tiny bit of straight print developer )
    i have it all in a 2 or 3 quart tupperware type container.
    since i can do this operation with the safelight on, it is easy ..
    i unwind the flm and peel off the pieces of masking tape that is keeping them in 1 long roll.
    they do curl a bit, so i get a tray of water and soak the paper in there for
    a few mins, until the curl relaxes
    then into the developer 1 at a time.
    it takes about 2 mins for an image to appear, and another 2 mins for "completion" ...
    coffee developer is nice because it is a lowish contrast develoepr, paper negatives tend to be filled with harsh contrast,
    unless it is overcast light ..

    great image you posted btw!

    john
    ask me how ..

  4. #34
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    John!

    Thanks for the tip about soaking the paper negs! I was wondering about that.

    By any chance can you explain to me in simple not mathematical heavy terms about paper ISO? The Ilford I'm using says ISO 200 and from reading here & other places on the net that most paper is an approximated 3-6 at most. But I'm finding with my Brownie that a 1/2 second in uber bright sun on snow is way too long but great in shadows. The pinhole is about a second exposure in the same light.

    Mind you the Brownie is with the smallest aperture and the second lever is all the way down...so no counting is needed. It's open and then closed.

    The pinhole is controlled with a magnet & not so quick arthritic hands.

    So being as I am a total noob (haha) any advice or explanation is welcome.

    And thanks regarding the pic.

  5. #35
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    i have a small wooden coffin that's abot 12cm long and maybe a 1/2 inch deep. Found it at Michael's & plan to paint it black...although using a regular size coffin would make a GREAT pinhole camera! Lol. Don't give me any more ideas. Lol!

  6. #36

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    Somewhere in this link is a few mentions on `tinkering' with film sizes. Cannot remember which cameras but i do recall that most of the write ups are done without too much seriousness, so it may not be wasted time clicking through some of the cameras here.

    http://junkstorecameras.com/

    regards

  7. #37
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Swensson View Post
    Somewhere in this link is a few mentions on `tinkering' with film sizes. Cannot remember which cameras but i do recall that most of the write ups are done without too much seriousness, so it may not be wasted time clicking through some of the cameras here.

    http://junkstorecameras.com/

    regards
    Awesome link! *drools*

  8. #38

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    hi susan

    i can't tell you why but the iso numbers for film are relative to film
    and the numbers published by the makers for paper are for paper.
    it is just the way they do it.

    some papers are iso 25 relative to film, so that might be why your
    exposures are to long

    have you tried to pre-flash your paper yet, to cut your contrast ?
    search here on apug to give you an idea how long and what you should do
    to flash it, i usually flash for .5 seconds or so ... but i can't remember anymore
    it has been a while.

    good to see you are having fun

    good luck !

    john


    Quote Originally Posted by pinhole_dreamer View Post
    John!

    Thanks for the tip about soaking the paper negs! I was wondering about that.

    By any chance can you explain to me in simple not mathematical heavy terms about paper ISO? The Ilford I'm using says ISO 200 and from reading here & other places on the net that most paper is an approximated 3-6 at most. But I'm finding with my Brownie that a 1/2 second in uber bright sun on snow is way too long but great in shadows. The pinhole is about a second exposure in the same light.

    Mind you the Brownie is with the smallest aperture and the second lever is all the way down...so no counting is needed. It's open and then closed.

    The pinhole is controlled with a magnet & not so quick arthritic hands.

    So being as I am a total noob (haha) any advice or explanation is welcome.

    And thanks regarding the pic.
    ask me how ..

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinhole_dreamer View Post
    i have a small wooden coffin that's abot 12cm long and maybe a 1/2 inch deep. Found it at Michael's & plan to paint it black...although using a regular size coffin would make a GREAT pinhole camera! Lol. Don't give me any more ideas. Lol!
    When you use a full size coffin, if you're inside, don't block the light from the pinhole. DAMHIK

    Also the exposures from six feet under take a REALLY long time.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    When you use a full size coffin, if you're inside, don't block the light from the pinhole. DAMHIK

    Also the exposures from six feet under take a REALLY long time.
    What's really odd, I had a funeral director offer me a full-sized coffin to turn into a pinhole camera! He thought it would be a great idea to have one in his funeral home. I'd have loved to been able to take him up on the offer but he called my office and, well, it's SO not allowed. I told him to run with it, though.

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