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  1. #1

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    Confusion kill me

    Welcome everyone

    I use now nikon d90 and nikon f5 film camera

    And I want to buy a MF camera

    But I'm very confused

    I have found several models

    Such as pentax 6*7

    But the price a little high

    and I have found mamiya m645 and mamiya 645 af

    the mamiya m645 very cheep i found it for 300 us dollar and lens very cheap also

    and the mamiya 645 af i found it for 700-800 us dollar

    the mamiya 645 af Exposure Metering only Center-weighted and Spot , without Matrix Metering , Is it important? for landscape and portrait? and what about the m645 ..?

    Thanks to all

  2. #2
    Blighty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Man from moon View Post
    the mamiya 645 af Exposure Metering only Center-weighted and Spot , without Matrix Metering , Is it important? for landscape and portrait?
    No.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  3. #3

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    I have a Mamiya M645 Pro with a metering prism finder N - and I have NEVER EVER missed matrix metering. One thing you'll notice once you actually get into medium format is that your speed will slow way-down. In medium format, I tend to compose very carefully, meter very carefully, and spend more time before releasing the shutter.

    So, NO, lack of matrix metering is not important.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4

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    There's nothing wrong with a non-matrix meter, you just have to be aware of what it's doing. If you're shooting a backlit subject (say, against a sky), adjust upwards. About the only situation where it might make a difference is shooting transparencies in tricky conditions, otherwise the negative exposure latitude will easily cover you.

    Pentax 6x7s aren't that bad, a non-MLU body, a TTL prism, and a 105/2.4 or 75/4.5 should run you around $120 each. But a 645 and a 6x7 are very different cameras. The 645 will shoot like a 35mm SLR, and the 6x7 will probably be a bit slower but with a much larger negative.

  5. #5

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    The only important thing in metering is you. I don't care what kind of gadgets you have it is all about experience.

    Jeff

  6. #6

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    And don't think it is difficult, because it is not.

  7. #7

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    I generally find that the cost of a new ligthmeter like a Sekonic 308s plus a non-metered prism is about the same as a metered prism. For the same money you get a lighter prism and a new meter that can be used with all your cameras vs a heavier prism with dubious metering capabilities. And you can use the Sekonic for flash metering too.
    Hasselblad, Mamiya RB, Nikonos, Canon EOS

  8. #8
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    +1 !
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Do you expect to be doing a lot of close focus/macro photography? If so, a meter prism is quite handy.

    If you like to use a camera with one lens and a minimum of other accessories, then a meter prism is handy.

    Otherwise, a hand meter works great.

    And if you'd like to consider a Mamiya 645 Super with a couple of lenses:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...nses-grip.html

    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10

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    Thanks to all

    so, i will buy it very soon

    But

    there is another problem

    In our country there are only two centers for imaging services like scanning and developing film

    All of them do not provide a good film scanr

    So I bought a films scanr for 35mm (plustek 7600)

    I searched for a mf scanr, but I cant find anything cheap

    I found a canon scan 9000f for 177 us dollar ,Is it good.?

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