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  1. #1

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    Hasselblad Automatic Bellows Manual

    Hello!

    Does anyone have a link or a pdf (or some other sort of) file of the Hasselblad Automatic Bellows Manual? (see picture attached)
    Unfortunately, i can not find it anywhere on the internet.

    [When this post is in the wrong sections, i am sorry for it. Administrators fell free to move this post to the right part of the forum.]

    Thank you!
    Regards!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails HAB.jpg  

  2. #2
    hka
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    Look here maybe you will find where you looking for.
    http://www.hasselbladhistorical.eu/HW/HWVSys.aspx
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

  3. #3

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    Thank you!

    I have already looked there, but found nothing!
    Nobody in here that uses the HABs?

    I am curious about how to use it.

    The thing is:
    For a film test I want to take a close up copy (1:1) of a transmission step wedge (its size is 6x6 cm).
    Since i only have a Bronica SQAi and don't have a macro lens that i can use for 1:1, i can use a friend's Hasselblad and the HABs (he has got it from someone but hardly used it and doesn't know how to work with it).

    I have never worked with a Hasselblad or Bellows, that is why i am asking for the manual (especially for calculating the correct exposure when using bellows).
    With his camera there also comes a meter prism finder (see attachment).
    So i am curious if there is the need of calculating the right exposure with bellows at all, when using the meter prism finder that uses TTL metering.

    Thank you!
    Regards!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hassel10.jpg  

  4. #4
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    Chris

    Check out WBM2 page 191. You need a bellows extension of twice the focal length for a 1:1 magnification. At that point, your exposure correction is 4x or 2 stops. Your meter will compensate for this automatically.

    Having said that: Note that a film test with someone else's camera may give you slightly skewed results, because his camera body and lenses may have a different flare factor than yours.

    Also, consider buying the 4x5 transmission step wedge from Stouffer. That way, you will get away with using extension rings on your 6x6 camera, and you don't have to borrow the Hasselblad and the bellows.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5

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    Mr. Lambrecht,

    Thanks for your reply and advice! It should really be the best solution to conduct the test with my own camera and equipment.

    I am totally confused with all that stuff on bellows, extension tubes and magnification.
    For my Bronica i have the 80mm (Minimum Focus Distance: 0.8m) and the 150mm (Minimum Focus Distance: 1.5 meters) lens.
    There are two extension tubes available for my camera: Automatic Extension Tube S-18 (i guess 18mm) and Automatic Extension Tube S-36 (i guess 36mm) and a 1.4x and 2x Teleconverter.
    I can't figure out what makes it possible for me to take a close up copy of the 4x5 inch (or 6x6cm)stouffer tablet.
    Last edited by qualsound; 03-03-2011 at 01:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qualsound View Post
    Mr. Lambrecht,

    Thanks for your reply and advice! It should really be the best solution to conduct the test with my own camera and equipment.

    I am totally confused with all that stuff on bellows, extension tubes and magnification.
    For my Bronica i have the 80mm (Minimum Focus Distance: 0.8m) and the 150mm (Minimum Focus Distance: 1.5 meters) lens.
    There are two extension tubes available for my camera: Automatic Extension Tube S-18 (i guess 18mm) and Automatic Extension Tube S-36 (i guess 36mm) and a 1.4x and 2x Teleconverter.
    I can't figure out what makes it possible for me to take a close up copy of the 4x5 inch (or 6x6cm)stouffer tablet.
    Chris

    It's all in the book on page 191, but anyway, let's see if we can't work this out.
    Assuming the S-36 is a 36mm extension tube, and we'll use it with the 80mm lens focused at infinity:

    m = (v/f)-1 = ((80+36)/80)-1 = 0.45

    The film diagonal of a 4x5 negative is 154 mm (see page 509). The film diagonal of a 6x6 negative is 72 mm. The 36mm extension tube will reduce the 4x5 negative diagonal to 154*0.45 = 69 mm. This will make it fit the 6x6 negative almost perfectly!

    Now to the exposure correction in f/stops:

    n = log(m+1)*2/log(2) = log(1+0.45)*2/log(2) = 1.07 = 1 stop (close enough)

    Hope this help but check my math!
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 03-03-2011 at 02:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Chris

    It's all in the book on page 191, but anyway, let's see if we can't work this out.
    Assuming the S-36 is a 36mm extension tube, and we'll use it with the 80mm lens focused at infinity:

    m = (v/f)-1 = ((80+36)/80)-1 = 0.45

    The film diagonal of a 4x5 negative is 154 mm (see page 509). The film diagonal of a 6x6 negative is 72 mm. The 36mm extension tube will reduce the 4x5 negative diagonal to 154*0.45 = 69 mm. This will make it fit the 6x6 negative almost perfectly!

    Now to the exposure correction in f/stops:

    n = log(m+1)*2/log(2) = log(1+0.45)*2/log(2) = 1.07 = 1 stop (close enough)

    Hope this help but check my math!
    Mr. Lambrecht, you are the BEST!
    Thank you so much for your help!!!
    To me it seems WBM2 is like a wizard's magic box...you can find everything in there (you just need to know where to look for it )

    For a guy like me, that has some kind of weakness in maths, your explanation was brilliant!
    I just need an example with figures to fully unterstand the connection between the formulae and their practical execution.

    Now i'm off, grabbing a stouffer 4x5 and a s-36, and the tests can begin.

    (One last question concerning page 509: What is the difference (or mutuality) between the left column "Diagonal full" and the right column "Diagonal4x5" in the Negative Details section?)

    Regards!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by qualsound View Post
    ... (One last question concerning page 509: What is the difference (or mutuality) between the left column "Diagonal full" and the right column "Diagonal4x5" in the Negative Details section?) ...
    The full diagonal is the true diagonal of a particular film format. 'Diagonal 4x5' refers to the diagonal of a rectangle with a 4x5 ratio fitting into that film format.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com



 

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