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  1. #21

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    You might also consider a Century Graphic (a Linhof 2x3 or Horseman VHR if you're feeling flush) with a rollfilm back. Even limited movements can go a long way. It's a completely different way of working, and it may not work for you ... but you won't know that unless you try it.

  2. #22

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    I have a LPL 7700 also. Produces nice light! My carriers are moulded plastic (one 35mm and one 645). There's a 6x7 (and I presume 6x6 version) too but they are expensive (about $100 AUD). If your carrier has metal inserts for different formats, if you can't locate the LPL ones, then a machine shop should be able to knock up a couple cheap. Alternatively, make some out of matt board... Thats what I use in my Durst M601 (glass inserts in carrier drove me nuts!)

  3. #23

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    For landscape/architecture work I honestly I have no idea why anyone shoots medium format.

    I was considering a P67 or RB67 but the simple fact I could assemble a large format kit for 1/2 the price, enjoy the benefits of a large negative and camera movements was more than I could ignore.

    If you are shooting commercial work or portrait or something where you need a little faster handling or easier flash integration, etc, etc.. well than I can see it but not for parking it on a tripid, with one thumb in your ear and one thumb on a cable release while you wait for the clouds to wander into the right position.

    Cheers,

  4. #24
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian_greant
    For landscape/architecture work I honestly I have no idea why anyone shoots medium format.

    I was considering a P67 or RB67 but the simple fact I could assemble a large format kit for 1/2 the price, enjoy the benefits of a large negative and camera movements was more than I could ignore.

    If you are shooting commercial work or portrait or something where you need a little faster handling or easier flash integration, etc, etc.. well than I can see it but not for parking it on a tripid, with one thumb in your ear and one thumb on a cable release while you wait for the clouds to wander into the right position.

    Cheers,
    Portability perhaps?
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian_greant
    For landscape/architecture work I honestly I have no idea why anyone shoots medium format.
    Cheers,
    Well, besides the price of really good lenses, carrying 10 rolls of 120 film in a backpack is a lot easier than carrying 50 film holders. Weston's adage about anything more than 50 feet from the car being unphotogenic is funny, but not usually true.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  6. #26

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    I agree with the previous posters concerning large format vs medium format. I've used 4x5. I loved it. But I'm older, lazier and fatter than I was at that time. My back and neck are also a mess these days--probably caused in part from carrying heavy photo equipment daily for so many years. Then there is the issue of enlarging and the need for a large format enlarger. They are not cheap and they take up a lot of room. There are lots of good reasons to use large format cameras but there's also good reasons to choose other options.

    Actually, I would love to have an 8x10. I've seen some of Weston's contact prints and they are inspiring.

  7. #27
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    In re: to 6x6 vs 6x7, according to Ansel Adams' book the 6x7 has 45% more negative area than the 6x6. He (or whoever wrote it) seems to really like the RZ67.

    William
    "I know of no country in which there is so little independence of mind and real freedom of discussion as in America." -- Alexis de Tocqueville

  8. #28
    VoidoidRamone's Avatar
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    I prefer 6x7, but I think Ansel Adams always shot 6x6 (Hasselblad). I think he wrote that he likes to shoot square, then crop in the printing process. IMO this sort of violates his "visualization" process... but he was still great. -Grant

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    Portability perhaps?
    A full on rail camera is a beast.. but many 4x5 field cameras are comparable in weight to the larger MF kits. I honestly think my large format kit isn't much heavier than my friends 'blad kit.

    It really depends on your frame of mind. I can go out with one lens, a couple filters, and four film holders and have a good day. Set up like that I'm not any heavier than most people's 35mm rigs.

  10. #30
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    The heart has reasons that reason does not know.

    ...as the French say.

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