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  1. #121
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianL View Post
    Selling them on eBay would be a deal. Some flipper will flood the market by offering all of them at one time and the value will drop like a rock. Postage will not be an isue as the seller will only offer pickup is the responsibility of the buyer. He may offer a deal through Mr. Richard Branson to get a ride to pickup.
    I talked with Jerry Ross (look him up) in 1992 about a robot returning one to Earth for sale to fund the space program... it would have to sell for Billlions to make it worth any trouble at all. Someday perhaps one will be brough back but I doubt it.

  2. #122
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    What about space dust?
    Again look at those Billions year old craters and such... the dust is absolutely negligible.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    Again look at those Billions year old craters and such... the dust is absolutely negligible.
    My lens is too short

  4. #124
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I have the JPG file here but don't intend to repost.

    PE

  5. #125

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    To get this thread back on track...

    Twelve astronauts walked on the moon in six separate missions. Eleven Hasselblads were left on the moon.

    "Eleven?" you ask.

    Yep. When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin* walked on the moon as the first humans to do so, they had one camera between them, and it was strapped to Neil's chest. The classic photo of an astronaut from that first landing that has been incorrectly attributed as Armstrong is actually Buzz.

    For each of the five missions that followed, each member of that mission was equipped with a camera, which is why there are eleven cameras left behind.

    As to "why," it's due to weight reasons.

    The cameras themselves were modified versions of the 500EL/M (?) in Hassy's product lineup. In addition to protections against the vacuum of space, radiation, etc., things like the mirror were removed to save weight.

    Incidentally, of the moon-modded Hasselblads, at least two never made it there: they were assigned to Apollo 13. I don't know what became of them, but I will also presume that the cameras meant for Apollo flights 18, 19, and 20 are still extant, as those programs were cancelled due to budget cuts.

    Dieter

  6. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by KarnyDoc View Post
    To get this thread back on track...

    Twelve astronauts walked on the moon in six separate missions. Eleven Hasselblads were left on the moon.

    "Eleven?" you ask.

    Yep. When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin* walked on the moon as the first humans to do so, they had one camera between them, and it was strapped to Neil's chest. The classic photo of an astronaut from that first landing that has been incorrectly attributed as Armstrong is actually Buzz.

    For each of the five missions that followed, each member of that mission was equipped with a camera, which is why there are eleven cameras left behind.

    As to "why," it's due to weight reasons.

    The cameras themselves were modified versions of the 500EL/M (?) in Hassy's product lineup. In addition to protections against the vacuum of space, radiation, etc., things like the mirror were removed to save weight.

    Incidentally, of the moon-modded Hasselblads, at least two never made it there: they were assigned to Apollo 13. I don't know what became of them, but I will also presume that the cameras meant for Apollo flights 18, 19, and 20 are still extant, as those programs were cancelled due to budget cuts.

    Dieter
    Dammit, I just HATE when I have a bout of encephalatic flatulence!

    I meant to add, as an asterisked postscript, that my girlfriend met Buzz Aldrin when she worked at Walt Disney World.

    Dieter

  7. #127

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    I love that album 'Dark Side Of The Moon' by Pink Floyd!

    Jeff

  8. #128
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    None,

    Nobody was actual on the moon. It was a studio in LA.

  9. #129
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    The Hasselblads were not protected from vacuum and radiation. It would have added too much to the weight. Kodak conducted tests under vacuum to ensure that the vacuum would not hurt the film over the time that the film was exposed to vacuum. Kodak did not run any radiation tests AFAIK.

    The film was coated on a special support of about 2 mil estar to allow more frames per roll, and the camera backs were modified to take the increased number of exposures.

    The person who modified the cameras is alive and well and still has lunch monthly with a group of the old timers from CCMTA. A friend of mine had lunch with them about 2 years ago. I have pictures of him and me holding John Glenn's modified camera, and I have a box of his spare parts for the camera modifications which includes a larger advance lever so that the astronaut can work it with his clumsy gloves.

    NASA has posted some photos taken by the lunar orbiter which clearly show the "remains" of the Apollo missions on the moon. Closeups show footprints and wheel marks as well.

    PE

  10. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The Hasselblads were not protected from vacuum and radiation. It would have added too much to the weight. Kodak conducted tests under vacuum to ensure that the vacuum would not hurt the film over the time that the film was exposed to vacuum. Kodak did not run any radiation tests AFAIK.

    The film was coated on a special support of about 2 mil estar to allow more frames per roll, and the camera backs were modified to take the increased number of exposures.

    The person who modified the cameras is alive and well and still has lunch monthly with a group of the old timers from CCMTA. A friend of mine had lunch with them about 2 years ago. I have pictures of him and me holding John Glenn's modified camera, and I have a box of his spare parts for the camera modifications which includes a larger advance lever so that the astronaut can work it with his clumsy gloves.

    NASA has posted some photos taken by the lunar orbiter which clearly show the "remains" of the Apollo missions on the moon. Closeups show footprints and wheel marks as well.

    PE
    Regarding my comments about the vacuum and radiation protection, I stand corrected. For that, PE, I thank you.

    Dieter Zakas
    Oops, NJ



 

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