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  1. #41
    Marvin's Avatar
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    I knew PE would have the scoop on the film. Was it slide or negative? I guess calculating exposure on the Moon would be tough.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by likemarlonbrando View Post
    does anyone know why they left them on the moon?
    They were jammed, dam wothless junkers!

    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
    I knew PE would have the scoop on the film. Was it slide or negative? I guess calculating exposure on the Moon would be tough.
    I'm not sure at this time. I only saw internegatives, but I believe that a bit of both were shot. I know that the orbital shots used a lot of ECN for stills which were then printed on ECP for slides and onto color paper.

    Some of the recovery shots were done on HS Ektachrome cross processed to give negatives. The shot of Sheppard on Life magazine was one such. The HS Ektachrome was pushed to ISO 400 from 160

    PE

  4. #44
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    Meh. They left ALL of 'em!!!

    They wanted *excellent* photos so they brought back their Mamiya's!!! ;-)

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmajor View Post
    Meh. They left ALL of 'em!!!

    They wanted *excellent* photos so they brought back their Mamiya's!!! ;-)
    Lol.

  6. #46
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    That is some cool info Mr. Photo Engineer. Never thought about volatiles evaporating in the vacuum.
    I always wondered about the Gamma radiation fogging the film... was there lead linings on the Blads?

    I talked with David Wolf (shuttle man), he spoke about how much radiation he received daily on the space station.
    Wolf said that in the Russian part of the station some of the windows are not lead glass and your hair will burn right off your arm when the sun shines directly through.

  7. #47
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    I have no idea about shielding.

    PE

  8. #48
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    It's funny to hear all the youngsters (my assumption) whining about leaving the cameras on the moon. Every aspect down to the last ounce was calculated. A the lunar Hasselblads had a mass of about 2 pounds.. that is a lot of rock samples.
    THe cameras that were in the command module made it home, what an impressive accomplishment. Every time I see Mr (Comander) Amrstron (and Cernan) I am in awe that they got on top of that rocket and figured just a 40% chance of making it back home (Armstrong at least, Cernan had confidence as it had been done.) PS Cernan piloted the lunar lander TWICE two different trips to the moon. He joked that he would have landed it on Apollo 10 (lunar decent test mission) if he had enough fuel to get back.

  9. #49
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    This book is full of "out-takes" from the lunar photography missions.
    http://www.amazon.com/Full-Moon-Andr.../dp/0375406344
    A real treat... I do wonder how long the family photo-Polaroid lasted on the lunar surface.
    No they didn't take a Polaroid Camera, but on the the astronauts took a polaroid photo of his wife and kids along and left it on the lunar surface. NASA allowed him or he took the liberty of snapping a photo of the polaroid in the lunar dust with the Hasselbald. It's a neat photo and a neat tribute to his family that must have been terrified the whole time he was on the mission.

  10. #50
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    There was a lot of "contraband" aboard every space flight, and some items just vanished appearing later in the hands of project members. Not everything you see as "real" is! Some of it is made up of extra materials, the real stuff having been distributed among the "staff". My crew was the first group signed onto John Glenn's pad after the launch. I picked 2 bolts off the ground that were still smoking and also one of the ring seals from the capsule. One of the bolts was a part of an explosive bolt that released the Atlas on launch. I still have them both.

    I have a spare film winder from one of the cameras that was tested and rejected due to size. It would not work with the glove. And, I have a photo of myself holding John Glenn's camera and standing in front of two other capsules in the white room. I still have my last set of white room garb, booties and hat!

    PE

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