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  1. #1
    rc51owner

    Almost too embarressed to ask this - what do I do with exposed film?

    Hey Everyone,

    so I have just started taking pictures with my new-to-me Hasselblad 501C and have exposed one film. I removed it from the film back but don't know what to do with it. It isn't like 35mm film with its own canister. Do I use an elastic band to keep the roll tight? Do I put it in an old sock and keep it in my sock draw until I am ready to get it processed? I really don't know.

    Regards,

    M

  2. #2
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Usually there is a little paper band that you either lick and stick or with Fuji you peel and stick. That holds it together so it doesn't get light leaks. If the paper band comes off then a rubber band will work fine. No need to put it in a sock or drawer, the backing paper keeps it light tight but you can put it in its film box if you're paranoid about it.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  3. #3
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    It is a good idea to keep it out of direct sunlight. I usually thrown them in the camera bag until I'm ready to develp them.
    Yes there is a lick and stick tab usually.

  4. #4
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Freestylephoto.biz actually sell a black plastic canister made by Maco for keeping your 120 film light tight.

    I like them and buy a few every time I make an order there.

  5. #5

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    As said by others, there should be a thin band of paper at the end of the roll. This paper is gummed on the back. Lick it and it will become sticky. It will keep the film from unrolling on its own. If I am not processing the film any time soon, I usually keep them in black light proof bag. It probably isn't necessary but that's what I do.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6
    Curt's Avatar
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    It's a one shot camera, keep the film and send me the camera.

    Just roll it up and stick or lick the tab and if it seems that the paper is a little loose then a rubber band is good or a piece of tape. Just don't leave it out in the open sun etc..
    It'll keep just find until you get it developed or develop it yourself.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    A small plastic or padded case is a good idea - the rolls are somewhat vulnerable to rough handling. You can find special purpose plastic cannisters (I have a few black ones) but I'm told that there are clear "M & M" holders that do just as well.

    The cardboard "Pro-Pack" boxes hold 5 exposed rolls just as effectively as unexposed film.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
    hpulley's Avatar
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    After developing some exposed rolls left like that for 50 years I think they're more light tight than people realize... And tougher too, the gelatin on base is actually pretty resiliant stuff in its paper backing as long as it is tightly wound onto the spool.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  9. #9

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    Hi, I use the little band on the film, or a piece of tape or a rubber band if I have lost that. Then, once they are home, I throw them all in a jumbo-sized Ziploc and put them in the fridge until I have about 300, then go on a processing binge. Before I get home, I keep them in pro pack boxes or my pocket, and always plastic bags in case of some sort of a spill. I use as many canisters as I have. Adox CHS films are worth buying just for the free canisters that come with the films IMO. At any rate, the important things are to keep them cool, dark, and dry.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #10
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    Like everyone says above, but beware rubber bands. If left on there long-term, they can cause a stress imprint in the film that will be visible in the image. But since you're going to develop it within a few days (right!?) it won't be a problem.

    I bought (for 50c!) a roll of exposed 120 film that was approx 45 years old. It was still light-tight, not that it really had any images left on it.

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