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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    The idea that landscape equals front-to-back sharpness is rather tired by now. Shoot some landscapes as you please... with wacky tilts with your lens wide open or whatever you fancy... and don't be surprised if people call it refreshing

    And I would say the inverse about portraiture: the idea that the eyes need to be tack sharp while the ears are blurred out... <yawn>

    There are no firm rules, but there are a lot of shots that have been done before. Experiment and find your own way....

    You might even (OMG!!!!) use a petzval for a landscape or use a pinhole for a portrait....
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    The table here summarized it very, very well. You don't need the actual table, though. Just look through your 'normal' lens of any focal length from the front and adjust the aperture to be about 6mm.

    If you change to a longer or shorter lens, just remember the F-Stop Number read off your lens aperture scale from above and keep using that.
    http://www.prograf.ru/rodenstock/lar...en.html#table2

  3. #13

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    I'm sure that many people will disagree with me but I like f16 to f32 for landscapes.

    Jeff

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    For fairly close-up portraits - it depends on the lens and the depth of field they produce. It's about the size of the aperture, and not the f/stop.
    For the 35mm format:
    35mm lens - f/2 (see attached picture if you don't believe decent portraits can be had with wide angle)
    50mm lens - f/2.8
    100mm lens - 5/5.6

    For the 120 6x6 format:
    80mm lens - f/5.6
    150mm lens - f/8 or f/11 (sometimes I'll shoot at f/5.6 too, depending on subject distance)

    For landscape:
    I use the hyperfocal distance to get into focus what I deem important, but my lenses perform best at around f/5.6 to f/8 (50mm Distagon and 80mm Planar).

    - Thomas
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100905_03.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15

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    I'm comfortable shooting landscapes at the F5.6-F11 range. That seems to cover sharpness for me and the editors out there. Don't shoot portraits though. If I did I would imagine I would shoot one to two stops down from open.

  6. #16
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    adjust the aperture to be about 6mm ...
    http://www.prograf.ru/rodenstock/lar...en.html#table2
    Well, I am so glad Rodenstock agrees with my findings [insert smiley if you need one].

    The optimum entrance pupil >for a normal lens< is in the 9 to 6cm range. Better lenses work best at 9mm.

    What I found in my testing, and that interests me and is born out in the Rodenstock table, is that the optimum aperture goes by format and not focal length..

    A 135mm lens used for 35mm works best at f5.6 - f8, a 135mm lens used for 8x10 works best at f32 - f45. The entrance pupil varies from 24mm - 17mm for 35mm format to 4mm - 3mm for 8x10 format.

    Why this is so is a mystery to me - any optics mavens care to comment [or sputter themselves into apoplexy].
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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  7. #17
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Nicholas I thought you knew this. Among the lenses with focal length that matches the film diagonal, as we have pointed out 6 to 9 cm across the board.

    The way it works when you change to a shorter or longer lens then the format diagonal is like this:
    Wider (shorter) lenses minimize the effects of diffraction by making the circles of confusion and Airy disks smaller on the film (allowing you to get by with an aperture smaller than 6mm)
    Longer lenses make the circles of confusion and Airy disks larger on the film (so you need an aperture larger than 6mm)

    Once you do the math on the bigger and smaller circles of confusion and the linear aperture and divide by focal length it works out that for a given format the optimum aperture f-stop NUMBER stays constant in each format.

    Is that what you were asking?

  8. #18
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I think the image of a 135, behind the lens, on the focal plane, is at the same magnification (the lens for large format will have a greater coverage circle but the same magnification).
    The 135mm looks a tele lens on 135 while the 135 on large format looks like a wide angle lens because the subject, in the large format, will appear smaller relative to the entire image.
    If you take a picture of a bell tower with a 135mm on 135 and a 135mm on LF, the bell tower will have the same absolute dimensions, in millimitres, on both films. But there will be more "stuff" (more film, more subject) around the bell tower of the LF film.

    I suppose the reason why there is more "tolerance" toward diffraction in LF is that LF is supposed to be magnified less during printing.

    Ralph Lambrecht will certainly explain this better (and correct me if I got it wrong).

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #19

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    it is all personal taste ...

    i usually don't stop down for either.
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  10. #20

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    f stops here

    There is a saying that I learned many years ago when I was freelancing.

    "What is the photo's end result or use?"

    If you want dreamy out of focus images, open the lens up. If you want your images tack sharp. Close down the f stops and be prepared to use a tripod and cable release.

    The one thing about photography is that there is more than one way to get an image on film. The question is. How do you want that image to print or be seen? What is the photo's end result or use?

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