Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,524,034   Online: 873
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Henry Alive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    185
    Images
    57

    The preferred aperture for landscapes and portraits.

    When you are taking landscapes, do you work with the smaller f/ aperture (ie f/22) or you work with a medium one (ie f/8)? And what about a portrait?
    Thanks,
    Henry.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Indian Territory
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    123
    Very much local situation/subject dependent.
    Geo.

  3. #3
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,624
    Images
    40
    Since I do most of my photography in the dense forest, and prefer everything to be within the DoF, I close all the way down -- or very close to it (f64 to f90). If I am out in the open, I'll open the lens up a bit if I do not have a lot of foreground (~f22).

    I have not done enough portraits to have a favorite f/stop.

    Vaughn

    Edited to add: Since I only contact print 8x10 negs, I am not worried about sharpness at f/90. If there is a touch of unsharpness, I'd rather have that than some areas sharply out of focus.
    Last edited by Vaughn; 05-03-2011 at 01:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #4
    Henry Alive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    185
    Images
    57
    Thanks, Geo. I am talking in general situations. My question comes from the fact that a medium aperture produces the best performance, but the highest depth of field is gotten in the smaller one.

  5. #5
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,107
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    I stay away from f16 and f22 with most of my lenses unless I REALY need DOF. I find things are less sharp at those apertures....
    Portraits I shoot them WIDE OPEN!!

    This is all very situational and to personal taste and style..

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Jersey Channel Islands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    430
    Blog Entries
    2
    For landscapes I will, as far as possible, use 11 as the majority of my lenses are over 50 years old and 11 seems to be the aperture that gives the best quality, for portraits it depends where the portrait is taken, most of them are outside and the aperture is set by the light, I use classic cameras and a lot of them have prontor shutters with fastest speed of 1/300 so opening up wide is not always possible, although some of my lenses such as a nova give interesting portraits wide open,when using one of my 35mm rangefinder with a compur shutter I have 1/500, so I can,when using one of these I can and often do go for 5.6
    Richard

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,309
    Way back in school, learning to use a 4x5 camera for portraiture (besides being a classic style and the cameras having movements, you could retouch the negatives) we were encouraged not to stop down below f/11. Not only were the studio flash units we used not all that powerful, but by limiting the DOF a little for head/shoulder closeups, you produced a more pleasing effect. Also, the effect of the home-made diffusers we fashioned (black tulle in a cardboard frame) would show, but the net pattern would not. Stopping down to f/16 began to show the pattern. Old-fashioned portrait lenses often were used wide open for limited DOF effects as well as speed on very slow old films. Much depends on the situation, style of portrait, subject-to-camera distance, lighting.

    In the landscape, I often am in a position where I want everything to be in focus. I'm not afraid to stop a MF lens down to f/22 or a LF lens down to f/32. I've even used f/64 and higher on 8x10. Depends on the situation. Since I rarely make big enlargements, I notice no appreciable quality loss due to small apertures.

    Peter Gomena

  8. #8
    Henry Alive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    185
    Images
    57
    Thanks to everybody. I am going to photography landscapes with f/8 aperture, and for portraits I am going to taste different apertures.
    Henry.

  9. #9
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19
    All is your vision.

  10. #10
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,372
    Images
    4
    The aperture to use is depends on the film format.

    In general the optimum aperture for resolution is around f5.6-f8 for 35mm, f9-f13 for 2 1/4 and f16-f22 for 4x5 & f32-f45 for 8x10. Higher quality lenses take the wider stop of the range, lower quality the narrower stop.

    Landscape photography would, in general, use the optimum aperture, with exceptions for depth of field issues.

    Portraiture works best with less sharpness and less depth of field - a portrait can look OK if only the nearest eye is in focus. Often 1 stop down from wide open is the best spot, very good lenses can be used wide-open.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin