Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,498   Posts: 1,543,123   Online: 1038
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,370
    Images
    60
    I have and use both systems.

    The TLRs are fairly compact and reasonably light, especially when you get into a two or three lens kit. The lenses (including their built in shutters) are particularly compact. I can fit a body, two lenses, WLF and a hand meter in a small camera bag (like one might use for a 35mm AF camera with a kit zoom lens).

    The RB67 is not compact and definitely not light. The lenses, in particular, are large and heavy.

    I use both handheld, and on a tripod. If you are going to shoot them handheld, the C330 and the RB-67 share the same left hand trigger grip, and I find it really useful.

    I have a C220 as well. As the C220 doesn't have the second, "trigger" shutter release, the trigger grip doesn't work with it. It also requires you to manually cock the shutter for each photo, so it isn't as fast to use as the C330. It is, however, a bit lighter and a bit more compact than the C330.

    IMHO, the Mamiya TLRs are the best cameras for shooting infra-red film (no need to view and focus through an incredibly dark filter).

    I don't find the parallax issues to be much of a problem - at least for distances of five feet and farther. I do have and use the paramender though.

    On the other hand .......

    The 6x7 negatives from the RB67 are really nice to print from.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    The main points being discussed are: reliability and sharper lenses. I have only used a Mamiya C330, so all I will say about the RB67 is half-observation, half-hearsay.

    In terms of sharpness, there are three lenses worth considering for the C system: 55mm, 105mm D or DS, and 180mm. The 135mm is also capable. You can get equal quality with the RB system, but I've heard that some of the latest optics (the K/L series) can have an edge.

    At any rate, the latest and greatest SLR lenses from Mamiya are for their RZ system.

    With respect to reliability, bear in mind that a Cxxx TLR is likely to be older (although both were produced concurrently for a while), while you can still get a new RB. Parts are not a problem for either if you have a good camera repair man in a large-ish city.

    My C330 was bought in EX condition from KEH, and it still required a fix because the gears inside the body did not advance the film properly. The 55mm I bought from someone who "repaired" still needed a shutter fix. But once that was done, no troubles whatsoever.

    AFAIK, many lenses for the RB67 and the TLR series are near-equivalent (same optical formulas), and they share some accessories (grips), so beyond that it boils down to your preference for SLR v. TLR, and the usability.

    With the RB system, film advance and shutter cocking are separate; on the C-series, they are simultaneous. The RB finder will black out after exposure; not on the TLR. With the RB you can switch backs; not with the TLR.

    The RB is handholdable if you want; the TLR is equally at ease on the tripod or in your hands. I find that its parallax indicator is very reliable, and for the rest I have a Paramender (seldom used).

    Although I have recently bought a Rolleiflex (Tessar), I have not put away my C330 because it's a very solid, very flexible TLR. In fact, if you like the TLR style, it's the most versatile camera you can get. The Rollei has in comparison the important advantage of being tiny and light. Lenses are in the same league, but different styles.

    Finally, the reason why I have 6x6 systems is that my enlarger stops there, so unless I buy a new one (or finally get the rare condenser kit for 6x7), I won't be going to the RB system, but it's such a cheap option, that I wish I could give it a try!
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Pentax 6x7 doesn't have a WLF, but is otherwise tempting.

    There is a WLF for the Pentax 6x7. I have one for mine.

  4. #14
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,863
    Change your mind?
    I don't know yet. But I just bought an RB67 with 55 and 180mm lenses, so I may find out.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    606
    If you're familiar with 5 x 4 a hand held MPP is lighter and more compact than an RB. A quality roll film folder is as compact as a 35mm. I had a C330 and it was a great camera but light it wasn't.

  6. #16
    Blighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, N.W. England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    876
    Images
    68
    I've owned and used both cameras and while the RB is a very capable camera, it's also more involved. The TLRs are lighter ( a basic C330, 80mm and WLF weighs about the same as my F5!). There's less fuss composing; it's a one movement wind-on and there are less moving parts - therefore less to go wrong. The lenses are pretty good too.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  7. #17
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    In addition to the lenses MHV listed, I also think the 80 is stellar.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,368
    Images
    64
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    In addition to the lenses MHV listed, I also think the 80 is stellar.
    While I like what comes out of all my C- lenses, the 80 seems to be about about 1/2 stop brighter than the others (105, 135, 180) at the same settings.

    My decision was also influenced by already owning a 6x6 enlarger

  9. #19
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    While I like what comes out of all my C- lenses, the 80 seems to be about about 1/2 stop brighter than the others (105, 135, 180) at the same settings.

    My decision was also influenced by already owning a 6x6 enlarger
    The silver shutter in my 80 runs a bit slow, so I either uprate films a hair (one EI) when I use it, or overexpose a half stop, as suggested by my camera repair guy. Same thing with one of my silver Mamiya Press shutters.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #20
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,252
    Images
    31
    I agree--the 80 is very sharp. The camera would never have been so successful without its normal lens being high quality. It softens a touch in the extreme corners, but that's a minor quibble. My shutter may also be a little slow, because my first negs were denser than expected. I just got a 65mm with dinged up filter rings and some internal haze for $35 shipped. The haze cleaned right off and I may able to straighten the threads. I hear conflicting stories about the performance of the 65mm--so we'll see how mine performs.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin