Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,814   Online: 740
      
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 46 of 46

Thread: "cheap" SLR

  1. #41
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,864
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Shiu View Post
    Um, the original poster indicated a preference for rectangle, see post #6. You rarely see a prism on a TLR, whereas most 645 SLR's have em. Not saying TLR is bad, but it does have some limitations.

    Jon
    Ok, I skimmed that one because it started with a comment on other cameras I wasn't addressing.

    WHY, of all the vBulletin sites I'm on, is this one the only one that doesn't allow multi quote??? ARGGHH!

    At any rate, I have seen quite a few Mamiya TLRs for sale with prisms, and the finders are readily available from KEH. The Rolleis are more rare, but not inexpensive in any case. If eye level viewing were really important and I wanted to get into MF on the cheap, a Mamiya TLR would be on the list, though admittedly there are other options.

  2. #42
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,864
    Quote Originally Posted by pbryld View Post
    What I'm looking for is a SLR/TLR that can take pictures with the sharpness of these: http://www.flickriver.com/groups/ric...l/interesting/
    Preferably rectangular pictures (I've been told cropping 6x6 is not an option, then i should just get a 35mm SLR).

    I don't know about the price. Is $200 too much limitation?

    In all honesty, I really doubt I will ever enlarge the pictures to more than 20" x equivalent". Should I just get a 35mm SLR then? Or am I compromising on the sharpness of the photo when enlarging them that much (in that case: to what degree can I enlarge 35mm TMAX without compromising on the image quality?)?


    Thanks in advance! I'm really glad to have come by such a helpful community.
    Who told you cropping 6x6 is not an option?

    That's rhetorical. I don't really care who told you; they're wrong.

    Cropping a 6x6 negative to 8x10 proportions means you use 6x4.5 cm or so of it. The only downside relative to having shot it on a 6x4.5 camera to start with are that you will waste a little film, getting fewer shots on a roll, and the camera is likely to be a bit larger and heavier. But on the other hand, you don't have to rotate it for horizontal and vertical as the cropping happens in the darkroom.

    Of course it will be half the size of a 6x9 negative and 64% the size of a 6x7 negative, but depending on your desired print size and tastes in quality (and film, and technique etc.) it's likely to be quite good enough.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    142
    Images
    4
    I was told by a member 4,5x6 wasn't worth it. Anyways, now I know Medium format is the way to go, so the hunting begins. I will definitely take all of your recommendations into consideration.

    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Why don't you start off right, and buy my complete Mamiya 645 super kit? You know there's no need for a CLA when you buy them LNIB.
    Tempting, but too expensive.

    Btw, what does CLA mean? I am guessing LNIB = like new in box?

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    142
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianL View Post
    Some very good suggestions here to the OP. What is your primary photo interest? It may be pertinent to the suggestions. If looking for macrophotography, a TLR is pretty much impractical, thought it is possible. For landscapes and still life, a TLR is as good as almost anything provided a fixed lense camera (except the Maymiya TLR) is acceptable. A modular SLR allows for the most flexibility if varied interests. There are also rangefinder cameras in both the fixed lens and multi-lens formats. A lot depends on what features you want, how it will be used and how it fels to you.
    I would primarily be shooting landscapes and buildings, portraits once in a while too. Do I need 2 lenses in that case?

    I don't mind the 6x6 format really, but I find square frames unflattering. Perhaps the solution to this is framing two square photos in one frame and just find a 6x6 camera, which seems to be the easiest. In worst case scenario I could just crop the image...

  5. #45
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,864
    Quote Originally Posted by pbryld View Post
    I was told by a member 4,5x6 wasn't worth it. Anyways, now I know Medium format is the way to go, so the hunting begins. I will definitely take all of your recommendations into consideration.



    Tempting, but too expensive.

    Btw, what does CLA mean? I am guessing LNIB = like new in box?
    6x4.5 not "worth it?" Just goes to show, ask a dozen people, you'll get about 20 opinions. The jump from 35mm to 6x4.5 is considerable as is the increase in quality. They may have meant if you're going to carry a MF camera kit anyway you may as well carry larger and that has some merit to it, but a 35mm frame has 864 square millimeters of film area. 6x4.5 has 2700. (These are based on 24x36 mm and the nominal 645 dimensions, though I understand the actual ones are a tad bit smaller for 645 I don't have that information, and it's a bit different when talking of cropping 6x6 anyway.) That's over three times the area. The improvement in quality is very significant. Of course 6x7 has 4200 sqaure millimeters and....

    CLA - Clean, Lube, Adjust.

    I'm not sure that being like new or even NIB (New In Box) when it's been sitting a while makes that un-needed though. Lube dries out more when it's not used than when exercised regularly, and light seals deteriorate more from age than anything. That's a nice Mamiya kit either way, though.

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    112
    i'm still the loony who will sing the praises of the Graflex RB series B (2-1/4in by 3-1/4in, or 6x9cm). My last one was 140 bucks with roll film holder and an astonishing 127mm coated Ektar. Those early 50s Kodak lenses give away nothing to their more modern counterparts, and all those shutter speeds mean great exposure control. Using one is like learning to ride a bike-- hard the first few times but once you get it, you got it. Plus you can fix them yourself if your handy at all. And it's a true SLR.

    --nosmok

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin