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  1. #1
    hoffy's Avatar
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    SQ metered finders - Which one?

    Howdy,

    Now that I have my SQ-Ai finally in my hands, it's time to start building up on my kit (or more importantly, start saving for!!).

    I have narrowed down my next few lens purchases, but would like to also get a reasonable metered finder for it as well.

    From my research, there are 4 metered finders available: MF, ME Finder S, AE Finder S and the AE finder SQ-i

    Now, the tech geek in me would dearly love to get an AE Finder SQ-i, but I have yet to actually see one of these for sale. Are they hard to come by? I am assuming they are expensive as well. Obviously, there is also the AE S, which seem to be quite common.

    But out of the MF and the ME, is there any real difference? Is any of the 4 mentioned here any better (or worse for that matter) then the other when it actually comes to meter accuracy?

    Cheers
    If you get a chance, check out my new Facebook Page, Kustoms On Silver!

    Hoffy's Flickr Photostream (Not quite analog Only, but nearly!)

  2. #2
    CGW
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    Lots of info here on the Bronica SQ line:

    http://www.ayton.id.au/gary/photo/photo_BronicaSQ.htm

  3. #3
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    From the Bronica SQ-Ai sales brochure:

    AE PRISM FINDER SQ-i
    The finder is loaded with functions which are important for exposure determination, such as built-in prism system which shows a bright laterally correct upright image; an aperture-priority TTL automatic exposure system which can be switched to manual control; a choice of spot metering or average metering; AE lock; and exposure compensation, etc. And, liquid crystal is utilized for LCD indications in the finder such as AE or manual mode; appropriate shutter speed; spot or average metering mode; AE lock; exposure compensation setting condition.

    ME PRISM FINDER S
    Manual exposure control with three LEDs in the finder, for match point TTL full-aperture exposure measurements, by adjusting built-in shutter speed dial (with intermediate settings) and aperture ring.

    MF PRISM FINDER S
    TTL manual exposure measurement type waist-level finder with built-in eyepiece adjustment ring and large eyecup. For careful composition work, in low angle shots, closeups and copy work. Same metering as the ME Prism Finder S.
    The other finders (Waist-Level Finder S, Prism Finder S, and Prism Finder 45D S) do not include any sort of metering.

    As an owner of all three types of metered finders, it is the WLF that is used on a regular basis - Having the flip-up magnifier is a definite advantage, and there are some shots that can not be taken with a prism finder.

  4. #4
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Thanks. I must admit I hadn't put two and two together.....I didn't realise that the MF was a waist level finder!!
    If you get a chance, check out my new Facebook Page, Kustoms On Silver!

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  5. #5
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Looks like Tamron have removed information about the Bronica line, but the information still exists: http://tamron.com/bronica/prod/sq_vfind.asp

    If you need any technical details about the SQ-Ai, I have a brochure I can scan as well as specs on all (most) of the lenses.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Now, the tech geek in me would dearly love to get an AE Finder SQ-i, but I have yet to actually see one of these for sale. Are they hard to come by? I am assuming they are expensive as well.
    I have now sold all of my Bronica SQ kit but had a AE SQ-i. It worked well, and seemed to have pretty good accuracy. You have the choice of spot or average metering at the flick of a switch.

    Compared to your modern SLR/DSLR it is not as “intelligent” so you still have to take the exposure it suggests and think if it is really suitable in less common shooting situations.

    From a usage point of view, not being able to look down on the camera meant you either had to use a tripod/support or hold it up to your eye level, which I found heavy and then hard to adjust with one hand. Other than that it was good.

    By the end, I must confess I was actually just using a Canon digital point-and-shoot, adjusting it on manual mode and then taking the settings off that, plus I then had a reference image too.

    I sold mine on eBay, they do come up every now and then as that was how I got an idea about value, I think there is very sporadic demand for them as they often end with no bids, then sell the next time for the same price when relisted.

    EDIT: I just checked, I sold mine for £200 GBP, in early 2010 on eBay.
    Last edited by jrhilton; 05-31-2011 at 12:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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