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  1. #11
    Trond's Avatar
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    I own a Bronica S2A and the tilt/shift bellows. You can focus from infinity with the bellows, but it doesn't allow for any movement at infinity with Bronica lenses, partly because of bellows compresson. With longer home made, and other adopted lenses, I suppose you could use some tilt, swing and shift. It's primarily a macro bellows.

    Other than that, nice camera and the lenses are good, and the bellows is good to have for macro work. Drawbacks: the camera is both heavy and load.

    Trond

  2. #12
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    A tilt-shift adapter by Zoerk

    http://www.zoerk.com/pages/p_pshift.htm

    can be applied to MF cameras with focal-plane shutters, such as certain Hasselblad or Pentax.

    As an alternative you might think about machining an adapter yourself as, if I get you right, you produce your own lenses and so you are able to machine (or you know somebody able to machine) a proper bayonet mount, lens barrel etc.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  3. #13
    DBP
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    Graflex SLR? I'm not sure how much movement the various models have, but you can always modify.

  4. #14

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    the RZ has a tilt-shift adapter (10 deg. tilt, 10mm shift). The Fuji GX680 has tilt/shift built in, but shutters are leaf shutters, as are the RZ shutters.

    how about one of the above with a big packard shutter? that should work ok.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morry Katz View Post
    A Rollei SL66 will give you plus or minus 8 degrees of tilt from the vertical plane. There are not very many SL66's on the market because there were not that many made.
    I should point out that you can only tilt "Up" when you are out beyond infinity. You can only tilt down at infinity. (But of course you'd want to be focus'ed out a little -and stopped down anyway). Its about 2" out before you can tilt up.
    Just to be clear, there is no shift on the body. There are shift lenses, but they are exceedingly rare.
    30,000 made, still a fair number about. They're less common though, and it takes a while to build up a question

    Quote Originally Posted by Fragomeni View Post
    Regarding the Rollei, how difficult are they to keep up? If not many were made then I'm assuming that means replacement parts are rare and expensive, is this a correct assumption?
    They're not too bad. There aren't that many *good* repairers, but Jurgen in Germany is spot on and does a really nice job. He has a stock of parts.

    They're highly mechanical cameras and most were made between 68 and 80 or there abouts, so they're getting on a bit, and you should expect to budget in some money to get it serviced.

  6. #16
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    The Arcbody does not have a focal plane shutter- it takes Hasselblad V-system lenses which were all leaf-shuttered in lens. One possible option for you could be a Hasselblad 200/2000 series camera which has a focal plane shutter, and the Hasselblad shift adapter. The downside of the hassy shift adapter is it also serves as a 1.4x teleconverter with the concordant loss of light. And it would be a rather rare accessory to boot.
    This is interesting and I didn't know about it but being a tilt/shift adapter it looks like the movements are quite limited as with most tilt/shift adapters.

    Look into an RB Graflex. They made them in 2x3 size. But still no movements. Although- since you home-brew lenses, hacking an RB Graflex front standard would not be that big a deal for you, so you could find one that's cosmetically rough but functional and give it front tilts and swings.
    I have several R.B. Graflex cameras. I have a Super D set up with a f2 homebrew lens at the moment and it works well but I wouldn't be willing to cut this one up. I have thought about picking up a 2x3 and modifying the front standard. I enjoy shooting with the cameras so perhaps that is an option. In excellent condition the shutters are pretty dead on speed too.
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

  7. #17

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    Plaubel Pecoflex, essentially a 6x9 Peco Junior with the rear standard replaced by a Makiflex. There is a similar version of the 6x9 Arca Swiss Reflex. Both very rare.

    I have a 2x3 Graflex RB Series B set up to attach to the rear standard of my 2x3 SuperCambo. 4x5 Cambos are a lot easier to find, also much less expensive, than 2x3s.

    None of these will work with your short fast simple lenses unless you plan to shoot very close-up. Your lenses don't have enough back focus to clear any of these cameras' mirrors at low magnification. These cameras also won't work with the fast complex 4" or so lenses I use on my 2x3 Speed Graphic. Same problem.

    If you're going to do much adapting of lenses to bodies, its time for you to learn about the importance of back focus.

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