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  1. #21

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    Well, as it happens, it is fun to play with the old-fashioned strong verbs and conjugate them by using the Indo-European ablaut. However, as far along as modern English is, many possible forms alread have other meanings, e.g., "dink, dank, & dunk" are forms that all have other meanings and that precludes their use as strong verbs together, as above.

    Some verbs have odd remnants of what might once have been a regular progression, such as hang, hung, and hung or hanged (for ppl.).

    I applaud youze guys for playing around with it, as that could stimulate you to learn.
    Geo.

  2. #22

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    Improper pronunciation by itself can be funny too, especially here in Germany:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmOTpIVxji8

  3. #23
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    "Who'da thunk it?" is an old, old phrase, meant as a joke.

    It's not proper English, but quite commonly used.

    The proper phrase would be "Who would have thought it?"

    - Leigh
    Exactly what I was going to say.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #24
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    The OP obviously used the archaic past participial "thunk" for comedic effect, it is correct English but a form that's fallen out of common usage, like the phrase "in back" that is still used in the US that dates back to the seventeenth century in England and taken over to America by the first settlers that hasn't been in use in Britain for hundreds of years we say "in the back".
    Ben

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    The OP obviously used the archaic past participial "thunk" for comedic effect, it is correct English but a form that's fallen out of common usage, like the phrase "in back" that is still used in the US that dates back to the seventeenth century in England and taken over to America by the first settlers that hasn't been in use in Britain for hundreds of years we say "in the back".
    Am I right in thinking you are an avid BBC Radio 4 listener...?

  6. #26
    CGW
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    I can (barely) take amateur photographers but wannabe lexicographers and grammarians? Find your own site.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    I can (barely) take amateur photographers but wannabe lexicographers and grammarians? Find your own site.
    Hilarious!

  8. #28

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    Please pay attention! This is how you conjugate the verb 'to be':

    I be
    You be
    We be
    They be

  9. #29
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    When my girlfriends daughter was around two or three, my girlfriend must have been tell her daughter too often to behave. Her daughter answered, "But Mommy I am having!

    So the proper conjugation of behoove is "hooving" for the plural and "hoofing" for the singular.



    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #30

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    Benjiboy wrote: "The OP obviously used the archaic past participial "thunk" for comedic effect, it is correct English but a form that's fallen out of common usage,"

    That is an interesting theory, but if the O.E.D. does not find that as a probable etymology, then it is unlikely: not impossible, just unlikely.

    Today, it apparently finds application in the computer world; the meaning of which eludes me.

    At any rate, I will apologize for contributing to the thread being hijacked and yes, we should move it elsewhere.
    Geo.

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