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  1. #1

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    Are circular polarizers as good as linear?

    I bought a Pro Master polarizer filter a few weeks ago and got the second test film back today. It is a 77mm used on an RB67 (127mm). I noticed the first time I tried it that turning it just didn't seem to darken up the sky like my polarizers that I use on 35mm. I don't like to crank the thing to the darkest spot anyway, I usually go about half way as I don't like these pictures you see on a beach with the sky looking like a storm is coming it. Anyway, about all I can say is that it does seperate the clouds a little, but no much. This is probably not the right forum for this question, but it is one of those questions that could go anywhere. I know that my manual focus camera does not need a circular but that was all they had. Is it the fact that it is a Pro Master filter and not a Hoya or Tiffen that is the problem or that it is not a linear? Thanks. Ric.

  2. #2

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    I cannot speak for Pro Master filters as I've never used them, but, if you're not already aware, you should be using a circular polarizer if you're camera has a beam splitter in the viewing system that allows built-in meters to do their job. The non-circular type is for use with cameras that do not have a beam splitter (e.g., a view camera).

  3. #3
    CGW
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    Lots of variables can affect your images but have a look here:

    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...olarizers.html

    BTW, Mamiya only made circular 77mm polarizers for the RB system. Mine work as they should.

  4. #4
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    As a cheap person, I buy a lot my equipment used. My take has been, linear polarizes stronger than circular, and, good name brands are stronger than no-name generic brands. This of course, is very general and unscientific.
    I tend to buy good name brands and use linear,as I have no cameras that need circular. Just IMHO.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  5. #5
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    This seems to be a pretty good explanation.

    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...olarizers.html
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #6
    Ole
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    Circular polarizers are linear polarizers with an additional layer that depolarizes the light so that the in-camera sensors work accurately.

    Like linear polarizers, they come in various qualities - some are better than others. Apart from that (and price), there is no difference.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #7

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    Also the polarizers work best at a angle to the sun.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    lxdude's Avatar
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    I stay out of the linear vs. circular debate-too polarizing.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Circular polarizers are linear polarizers with an additional layer that depolarizes the light so that the in-camera sensors work accurately.
    I hate to be pedantic, but they don't have a layer that depolarizes the light. They have a layer (a quarter wave plate) that circularly polarizes the linearly polarized light. Circularly polarized light is still polarized. And that's why they call it a circular polarizer filter.

  10. #10
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    My experience is that the polarization is identical between them. In theory a circular polarizer could have more flare issues than a linear one, but I've not really seen that in practice (nor have I specifically tested for it).

    If your camera has TTL metering and/or autofocus, circular is the best way to go. If you want to use linear, you can, but you should use an external meter and focus manually.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

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