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  1. #11
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Hi Ed and Tom, thank you very for your input! I guess I won't be chasing kids with that camera will I?
    Why not "chase kids"? It is a medium format camera ... and has been used extensively for just that purpose.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #12
    Fintan's Avatar
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    Its great to hear your questions Nicole and your enthusiasm for your 500cm

    I had all these questions myself and a friend of mine gave me The Hasselblad Manual by Wildi Fourth edition. You can pick these up easily on the net, you dont need the current version.

    A good resource for lens info is also http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/hassylenses.html

  3. #13
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Actually ended changing my order in the last minute from the 500c/m to a 501c/m.
    Thanks Ed - I will be chasing the kids and can't wait! Just 1 or 2 more days before I get my hands on it. Thanks everyone!

  4. #14
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    OK ... research done.

    I've scanned the lens diagrams from the Hasselblad Lens catalog, and I'm attaching two of them, for the Planar CF f/2.8 80mm and the Sonnar f/4 150mm.

    Caveats abound! Apparently, there is *no* cast-in-steel standard as far as configuration go... the CF f/2.8 80mm Planar, the CF f/5.6 135mm Macro-Planar, the FE f/2 110mm Planar all have seven (7) elements; the CF f3.5 100mm Planar has five (5); the CF f/4 120 mm Makro-Planar has six (6). The Sonnar CF f/4 150mm, FE f/2.8 150mm, and f/4 180mm have five (5);the Sonnar f/5.6 250mm has four (4).

    If one squints - a lot - there appears to be a general uniformity of configiration in the design of Planars, Sonnars, Distagons, and Tele/Tessars - but they once one gets closer than two or three feet, they seem to differ more than conform.
    Anyway ... thay are ALL damn fine pieces of equipment, in my book.

    Here are my attempts at attaching:
    Last edited by Ed Sukach; 07-27-2007 at 08:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #15
    Helen B's Avatar
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    I don't know whether anybody's interested, but here goes with a very simplifed and generalised explanation of the differences between Sonnars and Planars. I ain't no Erwin Puts.

    Sometimes it's a good game to compare the groups rather than the elements - and more of a pattern may emerge. However, compounding and splitting can affect both the number of elements and the number of groups without altering the basic lens type.

    The Sonnar is generally an 'improved triplet' design - ie three groups with the addition of a positive meniscus in front. The triplet itself may be compounded and it may be split. Lots of variations on the theme. They are generally compact for their focal length - the rear node may be very close to the front of the lens - ie the lens isn't much longer than its focal length.

    The Tessar is a simpler improvement of the triplet, usually by compounding only but splitting is also used.

    The Planar is a 'double Gauss derivative': Ed's diagram is a good illustration of meniscus groups with the concave surface facing the iris - a characteristic feature of the double Gauss arrangement. Meniscus lenses have both their surfaces curving the same way, but with different curvatures. Double Gauss derivatives represent some of the finest fast standard lenses around.

    Zeiss seem to use the lens names to describe the type, pretty much. Leica, on the other hand, tend to link the name to the maximum aperture.

    So there you go.

    Best,
    Helen
    PS It's ages since I used a Hasselblad - but I use Planars and Sonnars etc with my Rolleiflexes.

  6. #16

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    And just to add to the confusion: Tele-Tessars are telephotos, Distagons are reverse telephotos (wideangle), and Biogons are symmetric (nonretrofocus) wideangles. Wasn't that useful? (let's not even get into Schneiderspeak ...)

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