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  1. #11
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, John;

    The way this thread has been wandering is interesting.

    Bruce Muir has already suggested the Koni-Omega Rapid Rangefinder 120/220 Roll Film MF camera. This camera does have the coupled rangefinder that you specified, and it is not all that expensive. If you get the Rapid-M version, you can choose either 120 or 220 film by which magazine you select. The normal lens is a 90mm, but a 58/60mm wide angle and a 180mm telephoto are also available. There was a 135mm short telephoto also, but those do not appear very often. The later versions were known as the Model 100 or Model 200, again depending on the fixed 120 magazine or the interchangeable magazines for 120 or 220 film.

    You did say that you wanted a coupled rangefinder, and there is also some consideration for finances.

    This camera actually did originate right here in the United States when at the end of World War II the US Navy called for a camera that would take 120 film, but had the handling characteristics of a 35mm rangefinder camera. It was the Simmons Brothers of Simmons Omega Enlargers who came up with the original design, but the Konishiroku Photo Industry Company, Limited of Tokyo, Japan (who made the Konica cameras and Hexanon lenses) were the ones who were able to achieve a measure of commercial success with the camera.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  2. #12
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    When you look at the Koni - Omega system you need to be careful. The lenses are all interchangeable, but the film backs are not. A Rapid M film back it completely useless with a Rapid 100 body.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    John, I sent you a PM about this....
    My "accessory rangefinder" for scale focus camera is a Pentax Auto 110 mounted to the shoe.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    My "accessory rangefinder" for scale focus camera is a Pentax Auto 110 mounted to the shoe.

    that's funny
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  5. #15
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    I second the suggestions for folders. I used Moskvas, Ikons, Iskras, Isolettes and many others and they never disappointed. My old hiking camera was a Moskva 5 and I swear it took the best pictures out of any camera I owned. How? I don't know. But the chromes are phenomenal....even compared to my M7II =X
    K.S. Klain

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Javins View Post
    Good morning, John;

    The way this thread has been wandering is interesting.

    Bruce Muir has already suggested the Koni-Omega Rapid Rangefinder 120/220 Roll Film MF camera. This camera does have the coupled rangefinder that you specified, and it is not all that expensive. If you get the Rapid-M version, you can choose either 120 or 220 film by which magazine you select. The normal lens is a 90mm, but a 58/60mm wide angle and a 180mm telephoto are also available. There was a 135mm short telephoto also, but those do not appear very often. The later versions were known as the Model 100 or Model 200, again depending on the fixed 120 magazine or the interchangeable magazines for 120 or 220 film.

    You did say that you wanted a coupled rangefinder, and there is also some consideration for finances.

    This camera actually did originate right here in the United States when at the end of World War II the US Navy called for a camera that would take 120 film, but had the handling characteristics of a 35mm rangefinder camera. It was the Simmons Brothers of Simmons Omega Enlargers who came up with the original design, but the Konishiroku Photo Industry Company, Limited of Tokyo, Japan (who made the Konica cameras and Hexanon lenses) were the ones who were able to achieve a measure of commercial success with the camera.

    hi ralph

    i have been thinking of the koni-omegas for a few years, and have almost
    bought one on more than one occasion .. but i guess what usually scares me off
    is they are usually beat on hard ( by a pro who used it to make a living )
    before they come on the used market ... and i have always heard ( maybe wrongly ? )
    that they can be difficult to repair or there aren't many repair people that have KO experience ..
    so after i sink a few hundred in a camera, then i am going to be out more $$ in repairs ...
    maybe my impressions are wrong, but that is why i have shy'd away ...

    not to mention people on ebay sometimes put wrong cameras and accessories
    together saying they "found it at an estate sale and have no idea
    anything about what they are selling ... bla bla bla "
    so i worry too, that i'd buy a camera that has mismatched components ...
    but the price was right !
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  7. #17
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    My "accessory rangefinder" for scale focus camera is a Pentax Auto 110 mounted to the shoe.
    Great idea! I have used a Pentax K1000 as rangefinder and lightmeter...the little 110 would be much better.

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Great idea! I have used a Pentax K1000 as rangefinder and lightmeter...the little 110 would be much better.
    Thanks.

    It started because I got a Nikonos at around the same time that I got a DOA Auto 110. The 110 was so cheap that it wasn't worth returning (or fixing), and it came with full set of lenses, so I got my money's worth. A trip to Samy's and I was able to rig a way to mount it on the Nikonos. No more ever so slightly out of focus pix with the excellent Nikonos lens! (Obviously I do not use the Nikonos as an underwater camera. I use it as a "rugged" camera that can also get wet on hikes and at the beach.)

    Interesting that my accessory "rangefinder" is actually an SLR.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    ...i have been thinking of the koni-omegas for a few years, and have almost
    bought one on more than one occasion .. but i guess what usually scares me off
    is they are usually beat on hard ( by a pro who used it to make a living )
    before they come on the used market ... and i have always heard ( maybe wrongly ? )
    that they can be difficult to repair or there aren't many repair people that have KO experience ..
    Greg Weber is the "go to" guy for these.

    I have a couple of them that I've collected through various auctions over the years. The downside, besides the fact that they have usually had hard use, is that they are 6x7 and 6x7 only. 2F's suggestion of a Mamiya 23 press camera kit will give you more versatility.

    On the other hand, a tuned up K-O is not only very portable and quick to use, as it was designed to be, but it is truly a tank of a camera that's battle field ready. In fact, you can probably use it as a weapon in a street fight, then after you beat the assailant senseless with it, you can still take pictures as evidence for your side of the story.

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #20
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    Greg Weber is the "go to" guy for these.

    I have a couple of them that I've collected through various auctions over the years. The downside, besides the fact that they have usually had hard use, is that they are 6x7 and 6x7 only. 2F's suggestion of a Mamiya 23 press camera kit will give you more versatility.

    On the other hand, a tuned up K-O is not only very portable and quick to use, as it was designed to be, but it is truly a tank of a camera that's battle field ready. In fact, you can probably use it as a weapon in a street fight, then after you beat the assailant senseless with it, you can still take pictures as evidence for your side of the story.

    MB
    I have thought about the super 23 as a weapon on some occasions. The handle will give you a nice leverage. You could probably block an axe swing and still take pictures afterwards. The rangefinder might be a bit off though.

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