Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,294   Posts: 1,535,495   Online: 1005
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    andys93integra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    I see some of the outdoor pics were shot at f8 for 1/250. On a sunny 16 day that would put you 1 stop overexposed with ISO 100.

    To me the wedding was just a difficult condition - shade with infiltrating sunlight (and that falling on the white dress!) and a brightly lit background.

    So you stayed at the Holiday Inn... I'd be happy with the exposure in your shots of the old depot and the Mulberry St bridge. Your neighborhood look good.
    I thought it was called the City Center Hotel? But now i see on the map it is a Holiday Inn lol. I live north of Minneapolis.

    And thanks to everyone to posted, i will try a few things and see how they work out.

    Andy
    Last edited by andys93integra; 08-10-2011 at 04:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,802
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    It just seems to me using a digital camera as a light meter to evaluate the light for a Rolleiflex is like pulling a stagecoach with a space rocket.
    I have done that!
    Jeff

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    65
    I love to see Rolleis being used!

    I don't see much shadow detail in the car show pics. I'd suggest overdevelopment. You definitely need to be developing your own film to properly control the results.

  4. #14
    andys93integra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by hidesert View Post
    I love to see Rolleis being used!
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by hidesert View Post
    I don't see much shadow detail in the car show pics. I'd suggest over development. You definitely need to be developing your own film to properly control the results.
    Does over development mean it would make them darker and not so bright?

    Probably because the scans are not high res, but not low res, in the middle. I had a 10x10 print made of one of the cars and i can see detail everywhere on the print.

    Andy

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    65
    Over development would make them lighter, mainly in the highlights and light colors. It has less effect in the shadows.

    Quote Originally Posted by andys93integra View Post
    Thanks!



    Does over development mean it would make them darker and not so bright?

    Probably because the scans are not high res, but not low res, in the middle. I had a 10x10 print made of one of the cars and i can see detail everywhere on the print.

    Andy

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    If these scanned images represent the way the prints look, I would say that the images are too contrasty - many of the light areas are a bit harsh. When shooting white clothing (or any white objects) in bright sunlight, cutting back on development time (maybe 20% less than normal) helps to keep the highlights from blocking up on the neg. As I recall, this was a standard approach for B&W film wedding photogs in past years. You can always step up contrast in the printing.
    Read up on the difference between exposure and development, and what each controls. It's the principle of the zone system.

  7. #17
    andys93integra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    If these scanned images represent the way the prints look, I would say that the images are too contrasty - many of the light areas are a bit harsh. When shooting white clothing (or any white objects) in bright sunlight, cutting back on development time (maybe 20% less than normal) helps to keep the highlights from blocking up on the neg. As I recall, this was a standard approach for B&W film wedding photogs in past years. You can always step up contrast in the printing.
    Read up on the difference between exposure and development, and what each controls. It's the principle of the zone system.
    I am currently working on exposure (by myself). I mean i am only using manual on my Nikon and not using it to meter on the Rolleis'. My thinking is if i only use the little chart as a reference (Exposure value chart on the back of the Rolleis') and try to find exposure only using my head i might have it down in a little while. And i might start using the slower film i have, which is 1 roll of delta 100 and 2 rolls of PanF+, that i bought a few weeks ago.

    Andy

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    It's difficult to expose consistently with any system without measuring in a consistent manner. You have to know what kind of value to which you are "placing" a given area in the subject. I am in the graphic arts business and we have a saying, "You can't manage what you don't measure". Art can be fun with unpredictable results, but only you know if it works for you. If you are unhappy with your results, check out some info on basic exposure and development, and do some controlled testing, it will pay off.
    Fred Picker published a great book in the 70's, "The Zone VI Workshop". I used to use it as a text on the college level, for beginners. It is written in a very conversational style, easy to understand, and gives exercises that work. I just did a quick Google search for his name, and within a minute found a number of used ones on Amazon from $4 up. (Ain't the internet grand!!)

  9. #19
    andys93integra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    39
    I will go check that out!

    Andy

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    538
    Another helpful approach to setting exposure-
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm
    As with many things in life, using just one approach to a problem has limits. Zone system, incident metering, spot metering, basic charts on cameras or old film sheets, Fred Parker's approach to 'guessing.

    The one thing I would suggest without fail: a small notebook and recording actual exposure info for each shot. Do this for a few weeks or months, go over a sheet of negatives with the notebook data, and things will make sense soon.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin